Weekly News Update

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- Minor announcement: I’m speaking in Seattle next month at Schwabe, Williamson & Wyatt! If you’re in Seattle, you can RSVP here, or check out more details on the Corporette Facebook page or my new “Hire Kat to Speak” page. :D
The Careerist wonders whether neon is appropriate for the workplace.
SavvySugar recommends some great, albeit a bit unusual, places to network.
Forbes Woman looks at careers where women are taking over (and where they’re not).
Inc Magazine suggests three ways to build a smarter, more productive routine. Meanwhile, GTD fans, Lifehacker looks at how David Allen organizes his workspace.
MintLife has some handy suggestions on how to spend $500M if you happen to win the lottery.

Did we miss anything? Add ‘em here, or send them to [email protected] Thank you!

Comments

  1. Kat,

    I’m at Schwabe’s Portland office and can’t make it up to the event. I’m so BUMMED to miss out on the chance to meet you and hear you talk. Enjoy the evening!!

  2. Congrats, Kat!

    TJ: I’m in the final rounds of an interview with a nonprofit. It’s a relatively low-level job (3-4 years experience) with a good deal of responsibility and visibility, but I’m worried about the salary. The interviewers loved me, and said I was overqualified, but at the risk of counting my chickens before they’ve hatched, I’m nervous about what they may offer for compensation. It’s not my absolute dream job, but it’s a good opportunity and I don’t have any other on the table offers.

    Any suggestions, ladies? Thanks in advance!

    • I don’t know how negotiable non-profit budges are, but perhaps you can negotiate for other perks. I think there have been threads about this before, but basically thinking vacation, title, work from home, nicer office, etc.

      On a vaguely related note, I recently read something about how one thing you should (could?) be asking for when negotiating compensation is for the employer to pay off all/part of your student loans as a sort of signing bonus. In exchange, I suppose you’d have to commit to work there for a certain period… Anyway, while I know folks who have gotten bonuses which they’ve used to pay off student loans, it would never have occured to me to ask an employer to help with loans directly. But the article made the point that to a company that maybe can’t afford to pay you top compensation, it may be worth it to make a lump sum payment in exchange for getting you to come on board. Anyway, not sure how relevant that is to the legal world, but food for thought, ladies.

      • while a great idea, this loan thing kind of makes me laugh in the context of negotiating with a nonprofit:) not a realistic ask at all unless it’s somewhere like Gates Foundation with more money than most countries- even then there are likely rules about spending as such.

        OP, nonprofit salaries range from low (zero-ish) to low/mid six figures completely depending on the organization and where you sit in it. it wouldn’t be shocking at all for them to offer you $28,000. that said, I’ve got friends making $115,000 for mid-level jobs, but those are at well-funded ones in DC and they are 14+ yrs out of school. I know people in the $70,000 range but they are higher level too. If you post more about the details, it might be easier to guess on range. But try not to get high expectations. And take it- that’s okay, get experience, money will come later.

        • I’m going in with low expectations, a master’s degree in communications (the job is in marketing/PR), and around 4 years combined experience. The job is in DC. Thanks for the tips thus far!

        • Oh, I was not suggesting that the OP ask this from the non-profit. Should have made that clear. Just a general something I never would have thought to ask for from anyone – thought it might be something to think about in general for others :)

          • AIMS didn’t mean to be snarky and actually read it that way- ie that you meant it more generally- it was just funny to me as someone who did the nonprofit thing with mega debt years ago to imagine their reaction to that question.

            Echo- actually the person i know in dc in six figures is in comms- environmental. who are well-funded these days. what sector is your org?

          • Oh, Ruby – I didn’t mean to respond as though I thought you were being snarky, but thanks for clarifying! Egads, but we’re sometimes a ridiculously polite and gracious group of ladies ;)
            So glad we’re not like the rest of the interwebs in this regard.

          • Ruby, good to hear! The corporate/b-to-b sector, with a focus in finance and consumer education. I really have no idea what to expect, but I wouldn’t be surprised at all if it was under 40.

    • NGO Worker :

      At my DC-based international nonprofit, you could expect a range of mid-30s to low 40s for a job that requires 1-4 years of experience, or mid-40s to low 50s for a job that requires 3-6 years. You’d be able to negotiate within the range. I suggest that, upon receiving an offer, you ask to know what the salary range is or whether you fall at the bottom, middle, or top of it. That way you’d know what the parameters for negotiation are.

  3. Kat, cool that you are coming to Seattle! I didn’t see the details on the link to the registration or fb page- can you post time/location etc.? I probably wouldn’t make an event (many of us that work at big companies aren’t downtown area during the day) but if you want to try for an informal corporette happy hour or something that could be fun to meet up.

  4. karenpadi :

    Hey Bay Area Corporettes!

    I has a few requests to do meet-ups more often (e.g., once per month). What would work best for everyone in terms of location and days of the week/times?

    If we do them more frequently, I can see us doing them in SF for those of you in the city. Would that be of interest?

  5. Similar threadjack to Echo’s…

    I left my midlaw litigation job in hopes of landing in house or gov’t work. About 50% of my work for midlaw was for a single quasi-government client for whom we served as general counsel. I loved that part of my job and hated the rest of it. Anyways, I had some successful interviews (made it to last round for 3 jobs) but no offers so I ended up taking a job at a very tiny law firm to be near my fiance. Definitely not my cup of tea and I’m still longing for in house or government work. An internship was just posted in the General Counsel’s office of a company I’ve been stalking and they’re looking for JD candidates or graduates. I’m going to apply and who knows if they’ll bother to call me back but is it career suicide for a 5th year associate to take an internship like this? My thought was best case scenario they make room for me permanently, worst case scenario I walk away with some in house experience. Am I oversimplifying that?

  6. Didn’t read the article but engineer here: neon is totally appropriate for work, as long as you’re willing to put up with all the work-zone related jokes. Just ask my supervisor with the neon orange polo shirt.

    • Just hired :

      I recently wore neon orange/coral nail polish (Nails Inc. Portobello – which is ridiculously gorgeous, btw) to an academic conference and didn’t get a single comment. :)

  7. Migraine Sufferer :

    Is this a CLE eligible event? ;)

  8. You may find that the women’s fashion guides are helpful when seeking to learnIt’s always a treat for The Time Machine Radio Crew to have Rachael on .

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