Suit of the Week: Theory

Theory Gabrielle BlazerFor busy working women, the suit is often the easiest outfit to throw on in the morning. In general, this feature is not about interview suits for women, which should be as classic and basic as you get — instead, this feature is about the slightly different suit that is fashionable, yet professional.

Happy Wednesday! I like this marled gray suit from Theory — it just looks classic, gorgeous, and really clean.  Yes, the pants have cuffs, but I’ll forgive them that (hey, even if I hate cuffs, some people like them). And kudos to Saks for finding a model who doesn’t look as if, right before the photographer took the shot, she was spun around multiple times then asked to do long division in her head. The jacket (Theory Gabrielle Blazer) is $395, and the pants (Theory Yadie Wool Pants) are $275.

Theory Gabrielle Blazer Theory Yadie Wool Pants

(L-5)

Comments

  1. Green Living TJ :

    Our waste management company has replaced our tiny recycling bins with large dumpster sized recycling bins. I am excited about this and want to make sure that we do our best to recycle. We don’t have to sort, which is wonderful, but I would love to hear any other advise on making sure every recyclable thing makes it in the dumpster.
    Does anyone know of recyclable bags? I am planning on a second trash can for our recyclables, but the idea of putting them in the can without a bag is just gross to me.

    TIA!

    • Anon for this :

      Related question: Does an item have to have the recyclable symbol on the bottom to be recyclable? Or, put another way, if there is no symbol, does that mean it’s automatically not recyclable?

      • Cornellian :

        the symbol should have a number with it. not all areas recycle all numbers, so even seeing the symbol doesn’t mean it’s recyclable. I think if it’s to be sold in the US, it must have a symbol if it is recyclable, but that I’m not sure about.

      • Yes, and as a follow up to my other comment below: Yes, if there is no recyclable symbol on the bottom of plastic or glass, it is not recyclable. Metal cans are different, they are recyclable, obviously.

        But it is a little more complicated than that, check with the instructions of your recycling carrier, and make sure you are putting in only items with the recyclable symbol, AND only the ones with the recycling numbers that your carrier accepts. It really can create major problems if you are throwing in things they cannot handle with their machines, just because they have a recycle symbol and because you want to recycle them.

        If you really can’t stand putting those things in the landfill (like me) there is another option but it does take more work, so you have to decide how important it is to you versus how much time you have to deal with recycling. But, often recycling centers can accept things that the carriers won’t. So, if you check the recycling centers near you, and find out what they can accept, you can collect those things separately and drop them at the center yourself. Unfortunately, they do not make recycling completely low maintenance for us yet.

      • Anon for this :

        And just so everyone knows: CEREAL BOXES ARE NOT RECYCLABLE!!! I drop stuff off at my recycling center, so I always see others who obviously care a lot about recycling, but they’re inadvertently ruining batches by putting in coated cardboard.

        • This not correct – it is city specific.

          Cereal boxes are paperboard, and they are accepted by most recycling operations. Also, most recyclers have people on a line sorting out things that cannot be recycled and sorting into the correct plastic numbers, glass colors, etc. If you think something is recyclable but aren’t 100%, toss it in your recycle bin and let them sort it out if it isn’t.

          • Yep. Check with your city or center. In NYC, the standard for paper seems to be if you can tear it, you can recycle it. But yet for plastics, takeout containers and yogurts are a no-go. Just look it up – it won’t take you more than a minute.

        • yeah, this is another common problem. Altho, again, it varies by carrier and county, my carrier does accept cereal boxes. But this is another reason you should check with your carrier and make sure to follow their instructions. Some carriers cannot accept any boxes from frozen food, because of the special coatings on them, some cannot accept milk/juice cartons because of the wax coating. If you really want to “do your best to recycle” that actually means carefully following the instructions of the company, not collecting everything that is theoretically recyclable, unfortunately. :o(

          • Anon for this :

            But they don’t have recycle symbols on them . . . So that seems contradictory to the advice above that things have to have recycling symbols to be recyclable.

          • Anon for this —

            In general, the recycle symbols are for plastic things.

            You don’t need a recycle symbol on newspaper to know that it’s recyclable.

            But, you do need to know what the local rules are. For example, our curbside recycling will take phone books, but the large dumpster-sized paper bins at the schools (which raise money for the schools) won’t take phone books.

      • MsLurksALot :

        Yay for your company to take recycling seriously!

        Recycling has changed a lot in the past 10 years, making it easier for consumers (or thrower-outers, really). You no longer have to make sure your yoghurt container is sparkly clean (though a courtesy rinse is appreciated by the underpaid sorters at the recycling yard) or to remove staples and sticky notes from paper before throwing them in the bin.

        A huge component of getting all the recyclables into the right dumpster requires your maintenance staff to know which bins hold trash and which hold recycling (ours put different color bags). Some companies have maintenance staff that “tag” contaminated recycling where someone has thrown trash (like food waste) into to notify the thrower-outer why they didn’t pick the contaminated stuff up.

        As lots of people have mentioned, the specifics of what you can recycle vary from one area to the next. My county recently started to accept #7 plastics but I have relatives in a rural area that burn most of their trash because they pay by volume to take stuff to the dump and there is no recycling at all. So there should be some easy-to-find info from your county or waste management company that can guide you.

        Good luck and happy recycling!

    • Some recycling companies do not want plastic bags of any kind in your recycling, because they can severely damage recycling machines. But many recycling programs/companies are different. You should get the info from your carrier about what they accept for recycling and stick to that list and nothing else. Don’t add things that are recyclable in theory if they are not on the list from your carrier. That is just going to cost them more money to deal with, and can end up putting companies out of business (it has happened).

      As for your recyclables trash can, honestly, I find it much easier to not have a bag. You should be rinsing and letting dry everything that is going into recycling anyway, so when i do that, my recycling bin is much cleaner than my trash can. But i also sometimes use a paper grocery bag to collect my recycling, so you could line your recycling can with a paper grocery bag.

      But definitely check with and follow the instructions of your recycling company.

      • This. My city doesn’t want anything in the recycling dumpster-type bin bagged at all, unless it’s shredded paper. We just take things out to the bin whenever we have something, or send it out with one of the kids. It’s just on the ground by the stairs to our deck, so a really convenient location. Takes 20 seconds, if that.

        • I have a wastepaper basket next to the garbage bin in my kitchen. I just put recyclable items in the basket and whenever it gets full I just take the whole thing out to the city recycling box in my garage and separate it as needed. Works like a charm and I don’t have to go outside every time I have something to recycle.

    • We all have plastic milk crates in our offices for recyclable paper. They get emptied into our one big bin.

    • We have a ton of trader joe’s paper bags, so we use those for recycling. We rinse everything, so it’s not messy, and the bag stands up on itself. Nothing fancy, but it works for us.

    • I have a 2nd trash can in my kitchen for recycling, which I line with a regular garbage bag. Since the town won’t accept recycling that is in bags, I carry the whole thing to the garage and pour the contents into the container that goes out to the street. This way, the can that lives in the kitchen stays relatively clean. I periodically clean out the curbside can, but it does get pretty funky. Even pre-rinsing all the recyclables doesn’t seem to help much.

    • If your carrier doesn’t want you to put plastic bags in, you could always still use a plastic bag liner in your “inside” trash can to keep the can clean, and then empty the bag into in the dumpster (then either reuse the bag or trash it). That would also make it easier to transport the items outside–I don’t care how short the walk is, I am the most uncoordinated person ever and often drop the one small item I’m carrying with two hands if I blink.

    • In the Pink :

      On the desk at home I have a nice looking big box/container from a container place. In it goes all the envelopes, blank papers, printer sheets, anything to be recycled. On the other side of this box I stack the magazines/catalogues. It’s where I sort the mail, do the bills and filing.

      On the day the regular trash is put out on the curb, the contents of this box goes into paper grocery bag in the garage. That’s put into the big old gren rolling bin on the every other week for curbside pickup.

      I have a decorative shoebox container in the bedroom to catch the other paper, reading materials, backing of makeup and otc med containers, etc. It gets put into the big bin on trash day too.

      In the garage, that grocery bag is kept in a smaller bin, the newspaper sort of size one., It was our original recycling curbside bin. We put all the glass, aluminum and plastic in there loosely. I hose this out about monthly; all it seems to need as it’s inside, even in our hot TX temps.

      In the garage, I have a pile of corrugated, cut down boxes waiting for the recyling day too.

      Then, when it’s the day, I put the grocery bags on the bottom of the wheeled bin/cart, then slide the stack of corrugated behind them (cut for width and height) and then, sorry to say, I pour the bing of the bottles, cans, jars out on top.

      I collect my office (solo shop here) paper and magazines and bring those home every other week in time to add to the home take-out day. Amazing the journals, waiting room stuff, and mail that accumulates.

      I’m sure I”m missing stuff…

      • very complicated in some places. all these replies make me glad to live in san francisco. everything can be recycled together, including cereal boxes and everything compostable (yard waste, food scraps, fruit peels, paper towels) can be composted together. and you can have as many large wheeeled bins as you need to put them in.

    • Blonde Lawyer :

      For homes or offices that don’t have recycling available – check with your local animal shelter. My shelter lines cages and litter boxes with newspaper and they happily take boat loads of newspaper donations. They also have a recycle bin for other paper items and they get money from that recycling. Last, they use small cardboard boxes like the kind office labels and stationary come in. More frequently, they get theirs from grocery stores and use the bins that hold cans. Those boxes are used for litter trays. They also use larger boxes including the size box that all the printer paper comes in. The lid is used as a litter tray and the box is used as a cat bed. My office donates a closet full of stuff to our animal shelter at least monthly.

      • In the Pink :

        Oh, in many cities, the leaf/lawn clipping can only be put out curbside if you use a special, biodegradable bag … usually made of cornstarch. If you want to keep your cans and bottles in something rather than tossed into the city’s big green bin, you might use those? For us, they are only available at some grocery stores and the big box hardware places. Yeah, the city doesn’t make it easy. FYI, the bags quickly react to heat so if they are stored in the garage, they don’t hold up for even one using. Hard knocks learning course here.

    • Here’s what I do – we recycle everything in Berkeley, you know.

      I have two kitchen garbage cans, both of which I line with a tall kitchen garbage bag. It seems like my recycling fills up at approximately the same rate as my garbage. (I sometimes have a few extra recyclables sitting on the counter.)

      When they’re both full, I dump the recyclables into the recycle bin, leaving the tall kitchen garbage bag still in the can. I throw away the other can’s garbage, bag and all. Then the used recycling bag-lined can becomes my new garbage can and so forth. This may be unclear, but I use half the number of bags I would otherwise use this way.

      Other options are using a biodegradable bag for your recycling or lining the can with a paper bag. But I am not sure using up a paper grocery bag is really better than using a plastic, and we use our own bags at the grocery store anyway, so we never have any paper bags to begin with.

      Trash has become complicated. y’all.

  2. Research, Not Law :

    Big thank you to all the kilt styling suggestions yesterday. I played around last night and will probably go with brown boots, camel/tan slim sweater, and cream infinity scarf. None of which were even items I considered before! Thanks!!

  3. anon for this :

    I just got tapped to greet and escort a very important foreign client around tomorrow. he’s here on behalf of his company and needs to get various things stamped and picked up in various cities. We’ll be ferrying around all day tomorrow.

    Anyone have any advice on what to wear? do? bring? I’m thinking comfortable suit, low heels, not a button down, laptop bag with relevant contact information and restaurant/travel information. Reading material? Are we supposed to converse on the train/in the car/etc?

    • AnonInfinity :

      I think that outfit sounds great! Comfortable, professional, and can walk around easily in it. I wouldn’t bring reading material and would try to talk with him while in transit unless he seems like he doesn’t want to chat.

    • I always err on the side of having reading material for me — something I don’t mind starting and stopping and that’s not too bulky to carry around. I don’t think I’d try to bring anything for him/her. :-)

      I’d make sure I had extra pens (various things stamped and picked up sounds like forms and/or signatures needed).

      I’d talk unless he doesn’t seem like he/she wants to talk. If no talking, then reading material for you is the easiest way to be occupied and in the background.

      Maybe check for a website about customs/politeness in his/her country, as well as info on the company and the person? Does anyone in your office know this client? Maybe ask them for hints?

      • +1 for looking up customs/politeness. You don’t want to accidentally insult him. For instance, in some cultures its very offensive to show someone the bottoms of your feet, so you would never sit cross legged, in others offering to shake his hand (as a woman) would be a faux pas. I worked for a Japanese company for 5 years and no one told me until the end that blowing your nose in front of or even in earshot of someone else was considered the height of rudeness – probably on part with passing gas or belching. Thank goodness for my sake I wasn’t the only one in the office with allergies or they would have thought I was the rudest person ever!

  4. backtowork :

    I hate Theory. Their suits are so classic and have wonderful clean lines . . . and only go up to a size 12. And it’s a small size 12, too. Curses on you, Theory!

    • Brooklyn, Esq. :

      Ditto!

      • In the Pink :

        Tritto! Why oh why wouldn’t a simple regular 12 do? And the line is espoused so often on this site…we ought to lobby them somehow…Kat as our spokesperson?

        • Truly not trying to be snarky or humblebrag here, but as someone who is vanity sized out of the brands that everyone else can buy (J. Crew, Banana, etc.), I appreciate Theory’s sizing. I wish women’s clothes were sized like men’s, i.e. by measurements, so that they were easier to shop for.

          • I’m totally with you on sizing by measurement. That would make life so much easier.

          • Sizing by measurement??? YES PLEASE!

          • I agree! Sizing by measurement is SO much better! Athleta sizes some of their sport tops that way. They always fit. I do think that most sizing charts are pretty accurate if you know your waist/hip measurement.

            As for Theory…I have to go up either 1 or 2 sizes in their suits. Strange.

  5. Has anyone tried the pumpkin spice latte at starbucks? I have a $5 gift card and an odd craving for it but I normally hate flavored coffees. I am almost certain I’ll be disappointed and yet… Reviews?

  6. Better late than never...? :

    Ladies, I need some advice! I had an interview the Friday before last (the 14th), which went quite late (beyond business hours). I figured that I would send out thank you notes first thing Monday morning, but then…I completely forgot! I was traveling last week and early this week, and only realized with horror that I had never sent one this morning, when one of my references emailed me to let me know that they had contacted him this past Friday. I suppose the fact that they contacted one of my references means that my lapse hasn’t put me out of the running, but I know it’s still bad form that I never sent a note – do you think it makes things better or more awkward to send one out a week and a half later? Am I just reminding them that I didn’t do it on time? If I send one, do I mention/ apologize for the lateness or not? I feel so silly for letting this happen! Thanks in advance!

    • What Miss Manners said about thank you notes for wedding/graduation presents, applies here – yes, late is better than never.

      • I disagree with this. Social etiquette and business etiquette aren’t the same. I think conflating the two marginalizes them both. Although I do blame this confusion for why people still think a handwritten snail-mail card on stationery is required or preferable. For a baby shower? Sure. For a job interview? Not so much.
        Not sending thank-yous at all is a defensible choice post-interview. But if you send them at all, IMO they have to be very quick. Sending it late is just saying that you think thank-you notes are important (debatable to begin with) but that getting them to this particular company was not a priority for you.

    • AnonInfinity :

      I wouldn’t send one at this point because it’s been too long.

      It’s probably not the end of the world because they did call your references!

    • I wouldn’t send one. It’s not always bad form to not send a note, but at this stage of the game it just seems weird. Forgetting to send one hasn’t hurt me yet. Don’t sweat it and good luck!

  7. TJ: I had a simple medical procedure go horribly wrong on Friday and have just been released from the hospital. My boss has been covering for my but isn’t happy about it and now I can’t go back to work until 10/3 at the earliest and if the test I have on Friday shows that I haven’t healed it will be 10/17 at the earliest.

    I’m in the midst of some projects that I’ve been able to be honest with the people I’m working with but last week I put out lots of phone calls for new work, and I’ve gotten an astonishing amount of replies (go figure). Should I put my out of office vm and email on? So far I haven’t and have just been forwarding everything to my boss. Should I try something like “I’m unexpectedly out of the office but in my absence call X?” Help!

    • Maddie Ross :

      Not sure about your office specifically, but in mine, I would definitely put up my out of office VM and email asap and alert my assistant as to who needed to be looped in on matters. Since you are out for medical reasons, I am assuming you probably should not be working or worrying, but rather healing during this time.

    • Are you able to work from home? Would you feel better if you did (some people go stir crazy and others don’t)?

      If you can work and feel up to it, then I would, unless it messes up any short-term disability you’re getting.

      If you’re not able to work, then the best thing to do is to update voice mail and e-mail out of office.

    • How awful for you! Hope you recover soon.
      In our office the protocol is to first ask the designee if you can put him/her as the backup contact in your out of office email. So I think you should check with your boss about this.

    • Office protocol is it’s my supervisor’s job to be on my out of office email and vm, and covering for me. I’m NOT supposed to be working or it could mess up my short term disability, but my boss keeps calling. My assistant is in the loop but most people have my direct number, I’m not sure if I can get it sent to her or not… something to think about.

      • I really think certain policies should be overhauled for the modern office worker age. The whole thing about disability requiring that you not work at all is just unrealistic. I know several women who have trouble with using disability for maternity for this problem. You can spend ten minutes a day emailing or returning calls but still not be able to put in a full day of work.

  8. Question about this suit– Theory is the brand that doesn’t accomodate women who have @sses, right?

    As in, if I have an @ss and some thigh, I should buy pants a size or two up and get the appropriate tailoring to make it fit my waist? (Or am I confusing Theory with another brand)?

    • You’re right – theory is like jCrew in terms of being built for women who are pretty straight up and down. And they don’t seem to vanity size much either, they’re one of the few brands I wear what I’d consider my ‘true’ size. If you wear a 6-8 at a Banana Republic/Ann Taylor you’re probably a 10 or a 12 in Theory.

      • I would actually say they’re even straighter than J Crew. I have some booty but I can wear J Crew but cannot wear Theory. And +1 on the not vanity sizing. Definitely take several sizes into the dressing room to see what your Theory size is.

        • Thanks, this is helpful. I think I’m like you– I can wear most J.Crew, but not all, and if so, probably cannot wear Theory.

          I hate vanity sizing too, it’s like a floating exchange rate. I think they should just use outright measurements (inches or cm, and measure at more points than just waist, hip, and inseam.) *sigh*

          • There was an NPR story this morning on out-of-control vanity sizing, in both women’s clothes and menswear.

          • *snerk* We need a Big Mac Index equivalent for clothing retailers.

          • Theory is definitely not for the curvy.

          • I like vanity sizing; if not for vanity sizing, I – who am not much bigger than the average American – wouldn’t be able to shop at most retailers.

            I would prefer if most stores carried a larger range of sizes instead of messing with the numbers, granted (and would doubly preferred if they just labelled things by waist size and in-seam), but at least this way I can shop in brick and mortar stores some of the time.

        • Huh, interesting to know. From their size charts, it actually looks like the pants would be quite curvy (for a size 12, 29-30″ waist and 41″ hips, so more than a 10″ difference between waist and hips).

          • des-pairing :

            I’ve actually found their pants to be unforgiving on my straight-ish figure

      • aesthetic intelligence :

        Wow, that is not an insignificant difference. Just saying.

    • SF Bay Associate :

      Last time I tried on Theory pants, I had to go up three or four sizes to get it to fit right in the hips. The amount of tailoring that would be required was not even remotely worth it. Beautiful suit for someone else.

      • I am a size 0-2 in J.Crew, Banana Republic, and Ann Taylor. I am slim but curvy (not in the euphemistic sense). I wear a size 8 in theory and have it tailored to fit in the waist. I consider myself a fairly petite person and have a hard time believing that there are only two sizes larger than the size I get in this brand. Seriously, they are missing out on a huge market share.

        • boo on theory :

          Yeah I am an 8-10 in the Jcrew/Banana world, am 5’11” tall and not all that curvy (i.e. Jcrew pencil skirts work for me) and I couldn’t get a size 12 pair of Theory pants over my hips. There are certain stores/brands that I just have to accept do not appreciate us amazons.

        • TO lawyer :

          wow this is unbelievable! And to think I really wanted to invest in a Theory suit…

        • phillygirlruns :

          same here – relatively slim but curvy and muscular. i LOVE theory’s “emery” cut trousers – the max c is a bit slim through the thighs for me. i wear a 4 in j.crew and get theory pants in an 8 and get the waist taken in when i get them hemmed. it doesn’t bother me because i like the fabric and cut so much otherwise, and i have to have the hemmed anyway.

  9. Sadly I would look ridiculous in these pants but I love the fabric.

  10. Does anyone want to do some ghost shoe shopping for me?
    Challenge: I’m a 10 E/WW. I’m looking for flats. I like Hush puppies, Softspots, and other comfort-y brands. I’ll reply and link to two pairs I have that I’m looking to nearly duplicate.

  11. Threadjack: I’m looking for very thin, light-weight button down shirts that I can layer under sweaters without creating weird lumps. I’m also on the busty side. Suggestions?

    • I have found that Old Navy and H&M are carrying very light-weight, chiffon (maybe?) button downs that I think will be great for putting under sweaters. I find crispy cotton shirts much too confining under a sweater. True, it’d be hard to wear these shirts without a sweater, because they are very sheer, but they’re cheap enough that I bought a couple for layering.

  12. karenpadi :

    Gender-Awareness Victory at my Office!

    Background: I work with (mostly) men. We have a goal we are trying to reach and, whenever someone successfully contributes to it, we all get a corny email with a picture of Superman congratulating the person. It’s fun and silly.

    Yesterday the (female) paralegals decided it wasn’t fair to the few female attorneys on the team to have to be Superman–so we get Wonder Woman!

    Yay! It’s really amazing about how much better I feel when the hero is my gender. Perhaps the experts in gender issues can explain it?

    • Anne Shirley :

      Huh. I actually think I’d be irritated if the paralegals changed something to distinguish me from my peers. And I’d rather not be associated with a scantily clad cartoonishly bosomed figure for my professional successes.

      • I’m sure the male attorneys lurve it when karenpadi thinks of them in a skintight, shiny jumpsuit… not.

        Not everything is sexism.

        • Anne Shirley :

          Agreed- I don’t necessarily think this is sexist either, I just read Karen’s story and had such a different reaction to it I thought the comparison was worth sharing. But really I just wish all offices could agree that champagne is how we say “thumbs up on that work” Champagne and/or thin mints

    • Hahaha… I love this!

  13. Recommendations for skinny jeans/jeggings for the curvy/large of thigh? These would be to wear with knee-high boots and with something tunic-length. I have some skinny jeans, but don’t feel like they fit well under my boots, and I put on my one pair of stretchy jeans only to remember why I hate them – too tight on the thigh and gaping everywhere at the waist = falling down pants. I would prefer something on the budget-friendly side. Thanks!

  14. I am going to a wedding and the couple has asked for donations in lieu of gifts. The charity I will be donating to has a very informal website, so I basically fill out all of the info.

    Do I make the gift “in honor of”? Is that the right phrasing?

    And, they will send a note to the couple if I want. Is that tacky?

    • maybe “in celebration of”?

    • AnonInfinity :

      I like that “in celebration of.” And I don’t think it’s tacky for the charity to send them a note of your donation. It’s just like when you send a gift and put your name on it IMO.

    • I work at a non-profit and have done lots of gift processing. We have two check boxes – in honor of and in memory of. I would probably write “in honor of the wedding of Jane Smith and John Doe”. Also, we do typically notify the honorees of gifts, but do not include the amount (I think that takes away the “tackiness”).

  15. Question about therapy and work. How do those of you that have a weekly psychiatry or psychology appointment deal with this at work? Do you just block it off your schedule and not say anything? I’m not high enough at my job that I can just not be there without telling anyone, but a weekly appointment would be a telling sign (and unfortunately looked down upon by coworkers I’m guessing). This must be a huge problem, because the few doctors that I find have night time slots have them all booked.

    • I say I have physical therapy. Same concept, minus the stigma.

    • harriet the spy :

      I would just block it off my schedule and not say anything; if anyone asks or if you want an excuse, there are lots of good reasons that people take a standing commitment — weight watchers, physical therapy, medical appointments, a weekly business lunch, etc. In my office, you can say, “Oh, it’s a minor medical issue,” and no one will ask a single follow-up question.

      Also, you might have more luck with morning appointments. Coming in late is sometimes less obvious than leaving mid-day.

    • I’d say physical therapy, too, if people ask. I did have physical therapy for my knee several years ago and started off 3x a week and it was hard to schedule the appts. I had to go before work (and be late), over lunch, or leave early. I hope the appointments make you feel better.

    • Anon for this :

      I have my appointment first thing in the morning. I get to work about 1/2 an hour “late,” but many of the other associates come in around the same time, so I don’t think it’s an issue. (I like going in the morning rather than middle of the day so I don’t have to take the time to travel to my appointment out of my work day, so I try to schedule all my appointments–physician, dentist, etc.–this way.) If anyone ever asked, I would just say that I have a weekly appointment.

      But I also want to say that a lot of people go to therapy–it’s very common and widely accepted in most big cities. So, I would encourage you not to think of this as an appointment that has any stigma attached to it–you are taking care of yourself, just as you would if you had a toothache or a chronic knee injury.

    • Depending on the time of day, physical therapy, taking a class, standing breakfast/lunch with a group of friends, meeting for a club/association, or appointment with a trainer at your gym are all good excuses.

    • I found someone who would see me outside of work hours. Not an option for everyone, but if it would be a big relief for you (it was for me), they do exist in big workaholic cities like DC and New York.

    • I’m lucky enough to be able to have my appointments at 7pm so as long as I’m out of the office by 6:45, I don’t have to tell anyone.

      On the therapy note, I’ve been going about 5 months and it is just becoming a place where I can vent, and I don’t feel like it is helping me or worth the money anymore. It is nice to have him there for a gut check on dealing with work and family stress, but I think once a week is overkill. Anyone else have this experience?

  16. Ineresting suit.

  17. I absolutely love this suit! If only I could afford it. *sighs*

  18. TJ: Any hints on where to buy dresses for the very long waisted? I think I’ve come to realize that my natural waist is in about the right spot, but my @ss is about 4 inches below where it should be (so the extra fabric of most dresses hits right at my lower back.. not a great look).

    I just spent forever tailoring the @ss out of a dress that I wasn’t willing to give up on (had to go back 3 times to get it right). I’d prefer to just find a brand or two that might actually work! Thoughts?

  19. This is probably too late, but just in case anyone sees this-I feel like I have read that you can use your anthro birthday discount online and not only in store, but I can’t figure out how. There’s no code on the card and the usual websites aren’t helping. (I know there’s an online birthday discount now too for some people, but I don’t have that, just the normal card.)

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