Weekly Roundup

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New York does a great round-up of “power belts” that would look great with a dress or sweater.

Forbes ranks the world’s 100 most powerful women.  Meanwhile, Jezebel wonders why they focus on power instead of money.

Ms-JD explains why, in the law at least, 1L grades are so vitally important.

The WSJ offers eight tips for how to be a great protege.

Let’s Talk Turkey warns that certain e-mail addresses have a stigma attached.

– What does one do if you dislike your hairy arms?  Shine wonders.

Bargain Friday’s TPS Report: Gap’s Striped Knee-High Socks

Our daily TPS reports suggest one piece of work-appropriate attire in a range of prices.
Women: Striped knee-high socks - true black stripe
Stick with us here:  boot season IS coming up, after all.  Perhaps we are insane, but we occasionally like to wear loud, colorful, crazy-patterned socks as our tiny way of — of what? Rebelling against adulthood and dress codes?  Being happy when we take off our boots?  Just generally protecting our feet from boots?  Who knows.  But really, we’re loving these socks.  They’re $7.50 at the Gap ($6 if you buy two pairs or more.)  Women: Striped knee-high socks – true black stripe

Incidentally, note that Gap is offering a $20 off of $100 promotion this weekend, and its sister site, Banana Republic, is offering 25% off of all orders over $100: For 4 days only, get 25% of $100 at BananaRepublic.com. Enter code: FALL25. Offer ends 8/23/09. Shop Now!

If you’ve recently seen a great work piece you’d like to recommend to the readers, please e-mail [email protected] with “TPS” in the subject line. Unless you ask otherwise, we’ll refer to you by your first initial.

LinkedIn: When Catastrophe Strikes…

A few weeks ago, a good friend of ours accidentally hit the button on her LinkedIn account that invites your “friends” — ALL of them, every single person in your e-mail account.

She was horrified. Within minutes she became aware of the mistake — when not only did she start hearing from recruiters, friends of friends who had been on mass-e-mails, and ex-dates (or, in any event, men who she had e-mailed with after meeting them through a dating service). We were already “linked” with her, but because we had e-mailed with her from various addresses, we were invited again. So we took particular note when, a week after the incident, we got a “reminder” e-mail, asking us to link to her — and then a week after that, yet another “reminder” e-mail.

Our question is to you, the readers — does anyone know anything she could have done to stopped the error, once she realized her mistake? Is there some hidden “unsend” button (which has saved us from making at least one stupid mistake in Gmail!). What’s your general opinion on “linking” with people — do you only do it with people whose work you would recommend? People who you know from a working capacity? Or do you treat it like Facebook — and allow anyone and everyone to link with you? (At least, that’s how we treat Facebook.)

Thursday’s TPS Report: Jessica Howard Belted Dress

Our daily TPS reports suggest one piece of work-appropriate attire in a range of prices.

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Today’s post is suggested by reader J, who — like us — wears dresses as often as possible in the summertime.  She recently purchased this dress, and notes that “for the price, the quality seems quite good (except for the belt, which is easily swapped).  Although it doesn’t say so in the description, the dress also has essentially invisible — yet deep — pockets. It’s incredibly flattering on. I think that it’s a great summer-to-fall dress.”  So do we — it’s lovely!  J got hers at Macy’s but we couldn’t find it on the website… it is also available at Dillards.com for $80.  Jessica Howard Belted Dress
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If you’ve recently seen a great work piece you’d like to recommend to the readers, please e-mail [email protected] with “TPS” in the subject line. Unless you ask otherwise, we’ll refer to you by your first initial.

Suit of the Week

For busy working women, the suit is often the easiest outfit to throw on in the morning. In general, this feature is not about interview suits, which should be as classic and basic as you get — instead, this feature is about the slightly different suit that is fashionable, yet professional.

Reader E brought this dress and matching jacket to our attention, noting with excitement that “J Crew came out with some cute twists on normal suit pieces.” We agree — we love that the dress is only slightly embellished with some subtle black on black “petals” at the placket. We also love the fact that the pieces are made of four-season merino wool, and that there are multiple pieces (jackets, dresses, pants) in matching fabric. The dress (Super 120s papillion dress) is $195; the jacket (Super 120s Lizza jacket) is $230.

Wednesday’s TPS Report: Calvin Klein Dolly Pumps

Our daily TPS reports suggest one piece of work-appropriate attire in a range of prices.
Calvin Klein - Dolly (Black) - Footwear
Today’s suggestion comes from reader J, who gushes about these Calvin Klein Dolly shoes:

I have literally walked several miles in them in a day and they (and my feet) held up great. They are a good height for pants or skirts (2 3/4″) , fashionable but not trendy and come in great colors – even hard to find classic navy!  This spring they had a nice cream color and it looks like they’ve just rolled out a black suede for fall.  At just under $100, they are a good deal for such a comfortable classic.  I have bought them in a couple of colors and couldn’t be happier with them.

(We are intrigued that they also come in dyeable satin, for $107, also — handy if you’re a bride or a bridesmaid.)  The ones pictured — classic black — are available at Zappos.com for $89.   Calvin Klein – Dolly (Black) – Footwear

If you’ve recently seen a great work piece you’d like to recommend to the readers, please e-mail [email protected] with “TPS” in the subject line. Unless you ask otherwise, we’ll refer to you by your first initial.