Guest Post: Is Microblading Worth It to Enhance Your Brows?

Is Microblading Worth It? Guest Post from Blue Collar Red LipstickAdina J. of Blue Collar Red Lipstick is one of my favorite work style bloggers and Instagrammers (and she’s a lawyer!) so I was excited to see that a) she’d written about her experience with microblading on her blog and then b) agreed to share it with us since I knew a lot of people were curious about whether microblading was worth it after our post on beauty treatments to save time.  Readers, have you tried microblading, or are you considering it? Have you used other things to enhance your brows, like growth serums or brow tinting (either salon or DIY methods)? HUGE thanks to Adina for sharing her microblading experience with us — and a warm welcome to Corporette! — Kat  

If you have more than a passing acquaintance with Instagram, then you have probably seen something about #microblading. And if you are anything like me — 30-something, with enough disposable income to satisfy my social media–driven curiosity about strange beauty trends — then you’ve probably considered trying it. If that’s the case, you probably have questions. I know I did. Having now gone through the experience, I can tell you that the answers I found online in my initial searches contained some glaring omissions. I’m going to try to address some of them.

Just in case you have not seen one of the bazillion Instagram videos floating around, let’s start with the basics. Microblading is the newest version of tattoo makeup. Unlike the regular tattoo process, which uses a needle (or needles), microblading uses tiny blades to create cuts in the skin, into which pigment is deposited. Each cut is intended to look like an individual eyebrow hair. The result is semi-permanent, lasting anywhere from one to three years. It is not an inexpensive procedure; at my spa, the cost was $375 for the original appointment plus the necessary follow-up, and this is on the lower end of the cost scale based on quotes I’ve seen online (for example, Piret Aava, the “Eyebrow Doctor,” charges $1,500 in NYC).

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Guest Post: Reader A’s Experiences with Cosmetic Rhinoplasty

Taking Time off Work for Plastic Surgery: What to Expect From an Adult Nose JobReader A recently pulled through the trigger on a nose job (rhinoplasty) that she’d considered for a long time — and lucky us, she wrote in to share her experiences with us! Her post is largely about what you should know about rhinoplasty as an adult, but in general I think there’s a broader Q that would make for a fascinating discussion with readers: Have YOU had any plastic surgery as an adult? Were you concerned with taking time off work for plastic surgery, discussing plastic surgery changes with your coworkers, or just general expense/recovery/risk issues? In particular, have you ever considered getting a cosmetic rhinoplasty? (Those of you who HAVE had a rhinoplasty for cosmetic reasons, please weigh in!) Optional surgery isn’t something we’ve talked about a lot, but in the past we’ve discussed breast reduction surgeryfreezing your eggs, and making time for many doctors appointments (and I know there have been a zillion reader threads on weight loss surgery and more!). HUGE thanks to Reader A for sharing her experiences with us! – Kat 

I used to be very self-conscious about my nose. It was too big for my face, the tip turned down a bit, and there was a significant bump on the bridge. Whenever my picture was taken, I always faced the camera head-on to try to make my nose look slightly better, although it didn’t help much. At the end of 2016, I started seriously considering a rhinoplasty (AKA a nose job), and after a lot of online research and an appointment at my chosen plastic surgeon’s office, I was really excited to schedule the procedure (so much so that I wasn’t even that nervous about having the surgery itself, and the only surgery I’d had before was a C-section).

Now, five months out from surgery, I am thrilled with the results and wish I had done it years ago. My nose isn’t the first thing you notice about my face anymore, I’m much more confident about how I look, and I actually like photos of myself. I offered to write a Corporette guest post on my experience, and here’s some of my advice:

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City Series: The Corporette® Guide to Los Angeles

guide to Los Angeles for womenThis mini-city guide to Los Angeles for women lawyers and other professionals comes from reader Auntie M, a longtime Los Angeles resident and born-and-raised Southern California girl (and former LA lawyer, and one of Kat’s oldest and best friends). She wants you to know that this guide is not meant to be all-inclusive, and even as she writes this, she knows she’s left off too much. Los Angeles is vast and confusing and a tough nut to crack, but it’s also glamorous and offbeat and artistic and delicious, a tough place to both love and leave. She also has Bruins in her blood, and knows that her second-favorite team is always the one that’s playing USC. Welcome back to Corporette®, M! Readers, you can check out other posts in our City Guide series here. Want to offer advice to the readers for YOUR city? Please fill out this form — we’d be so thankful for any advice you have! – Kat.

Where to Stay in Los Angeles

If you’re planning a trip to LA, then you probably already know how spread out it is. If you’re visiting for a specific reason or event, like a work or family event, you’ll probably want to stay close to wherever that is, for convenience – what they say about LA traffic is true, and although Angelenos love to brag about their super-secret side-street and back-road routes, if you don’t know the lay of the land, you will probably find yourself stuck in traffic and very frustrated.

If you’re just headed to LA for a vacation, where you decide to stay will depend on what you want. Sand and surf? Celeb-spotting? High-end shopping? If you’re looking for ideas, the Los Angeles Conservancy has some interesting suggestions for self-guided tours. Wherever you are, you will probably need to rent a car to see it all (more on that later), but here’s a quick look at what some of the areas have to offer:

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How Not to Gain Weight Over Summer Recruiting Season

how not to gain weight over summer recruiting seasonSummer recruiting season: always a trying time for those among us trying to maintain our weight (to say nothing of those of us trying to diet)! I still stand by my old advice on how to diet during the recruiting season, but I thought we’d refresh the post with a guest post from a good friend of mine, L, still in the trenches (which is to say, still attending recruiting cocktail parties and ritzy lunches).  Thank you, L! – Kat. Check out more resources for summer associates, here!

When I was a summer associate (in a year I will not name, but it was pre-economy collapse), I gained twelve pounds in about as many weeks.  A quantity of food I had previously called “lunch,” I started calling “an appetizer.”

Now, however, after navigating many more summer programs, I’ve figured out how to strike a good balance between having fun (free food!  free drinks! bonding!) and still managing to maintain a healthy lifestyle – and fit back into my fall clothes when the summer program comes to an end.

For many, recruiting events are a chance to eat at amazing restaurants and try delicious food, and I’m not discouraging you from participating in that experience.  But if you are concerned about gaining weight, then decide each meal whether the calorie splurge will be worth it.  For when it won’t be, here is my advice:

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A Guide to Suiting Alterations

2017 Update: We still stand by the advice below on suiting alterations for women, but you can also check out our most recent post on tailoring alterations for women!

We’ve talked a bit about tailoring, but what are the top alterations you should be thinking about with a suit?  Today’s guest poster, Jean from ExtraPetite, was nice enough to write up her guide to suiting alterations at the tailor, including fit tips, estimated cost, difficulty level, and more.  Enjoy! – Kat

suiting-alterationsFor many professional women, suit shopping can be a daunting task. Our bodies are unique and varied, so it’s tough to find a perfect fit right off the racks of mainstream retailers. A good tailor can take that store-bought suit to the next level – from a decent suit, to a power suit that will help you exude confidence and class.

Whether it’s a tiny tweak or a major overhaul – I’ve done it all. I’m here to share my alterations guide with fellow women who are walking around in a less-than perfectly fitting suit. [Read more…]

Tales from the Wallet: Refinancing Student Loans (Guest Post)

refinancing student loansHave you refinanced your student loans, or are you looking into it? We’ve talked about tackling huge school debt, paying down debt vs. saving, getting financially prepared for grad school, creating a money roadmap, and switching from a lawyer’s salary to a student lifestyle, but we haven’t discussed refinancing student loans. Today, Blonde Lawyer (the name she uses to comment on Corporette posts) shares her experience of refinancing with SoFi, one of a growing number of peer-to-peer lending companies (CommonBond is another) that offer student loan refinancing. The author is including a referral link of her own, but Kat / Corporette is not being compensated in any way for this post — it sounded like an interesting topic for readers to discuss, and hopefully this one reader’s experience will be a launchpad for discussion.  Thank you for writing this, Blonde Lawyer!  Here’s a recent WSJ article and a Reuters article for further reading on the topic. Update 2015: Blonde Lawyer has started a blog with more information.

I have noticed that a lot of Corporette readers are interested in potentially refinancing their student loans. I suggested to Kat that this would make a good “Tales from the Wallet” post and offered to write about my experience refinancing with SoFi. Hopefully there are other posters who refinanced with one of the other major players that can write about their experiences too.

So a little bit about me: I graduated law school in 2009. I went to an in-state school with in-state tuition. I paid my tuition 100% with Stafford loans ($59,500) and also took out living expense loans ($34,072) through a private loan company for a grand total of $93,572 in loans. After graduation, I was most worried about my $34,072 in private loans. My husband co-signed them and they were not dischargeable if I died or became disabled. The interest rate was a variable 8.61% with a 19% cap!!! I had one other issue with this company. I had selected a standard 10-year repayment for all my loans, but once the private loans entered repayment, the math wasn’t adding up to me.

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