Coffee Break: Heavyweight Full Zip Hooded Sweatshirt

American Giant Hoodies I had long heard tell of the amazing, highly rated American Giant sweatshirt for men. Great, you think, I’m always looking for a good gift for my husband/brother/boyfriend/father/___. But then you look at the price: $89? For a sweatshirt? After years of postponing the purchase, I finally bit and got one earlier this year for my husband, and I must say it is extremely thick, and the quality seems really high — I have a feeling this one will be around for decades. (They have a midweight sweatshirt and hoodie as well, but the one with all the great reviews seemed to be the heavyweight one, so that’s what I went for.) The sweatshirt is available in black, light gray, dark gray (pictured), navy, and teal, sizes S-XXL. If you’re a new customer, try this link for 15% off. AMERICAN GIANT / Mens Heavyweight Full Zip Hooded Sweatshirt

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Looking for more gift ideas? Check ‘em out here.  Readers, what do you get the men in your life? 

Comments

  1. My brother bought himself one of these. It’s nice and substantial – heavier cotton fleece, reinforced elbows, stitched down zipper tape. Lots of small details the build into a nice quality piece of clothing.

    • I think I will get one of these for Dad. Even tho it is expensive, I have learned OVER the year’s that if you buy something cheep, it will fall a part on you. I bought my dad a pair of slack’s on sale (famous name) but within one season (he said onley about 5 washing’s) it already started to get threadbare and is now a total SCHMATTA that mom onley let’s him use when he is cleaning the basement or the CAR. Now I could see mabye if it went at the knee’s or in the seat –my dad’s tuchus is also not microscopic, but it started to wear right where he put’s his hand’s in his pocket’s. And guess what, he is NOT a Knish Vendor makeing change in his pocket’s all day, either!

      So I learned dad’s lesson. You buy cheep, you get cheep. You buy good, you mabye get good. Dad is smart. That is why he has a doctoreate degree. YAY dad!!!!!

      David called out of the blue and want’s me to go ice skateing with him at Bryant Park. I told him mabye it’s better to go to the Wolman rink, b/c there was a shooteing at Bryant Park. He said OK, so I will go this weekend with him. He promised to buy me some hot chocalate there. YUMMY!!!!!!!

      • @Ellen my dad is a knish vendor, and I can tell you that sweatshirts like this cover his tuchus *and* wear quite well.

        Happy you heard back from David. Let me know how the ice skating goes!

  2. I am really looking forward to the responses to this — I’m at a loss for a milestone birthday gift for the husband.

  3. Reposting since the morning thread is so long- What do you think of this dress? I normally love Kay Unger and the color yellow (see username) but I can’t figure out if this reads too baby shower/brunch for an office in the summer. But the price!!

    http://www.neimanmarcus.com/Kay-Unger-New-York-Textured-Peplum-Dress-kay-unger-yellow/prod157350117___/p.prod?icid=&searchType=MAIN&rte=%252Fsearch.jsp%253FN%253D0%2526Ntt%253Dkay%252Bunger%252Byellow%2526_requestid%253D13059

    • That doesn’t read as professional to me.

      • Cosign. Between the scoop, the color and the ruffles, there’s a lot of skin and a lot of girly going on. This is a shower/tea/Easter dress. But it and wear it to that, not to work in summer.

    • I think you’d have to tone it down with a black blazer if you’re going to make it work. But then that hides the peplum. It does remind me of Easter.

    • If this dress could talk, it would say “Happy Easter!”

    • Hard to tell with the fabric, but casual day + hot summer + white blazer = this dress could work. I’m not wild about the peplum and I think if you’re busty, the neckline could look very different than on the model, but all in all, I don’t think it would be inappropriate in most offices assuming the fabric is substantial enough. But, it is a bit more “daytime wedding guest” than “professional office.”

      • Kaitlin C :

        I actually think I’ve seen someone at my office (NYC, large wall street bank) wear this dress and I thought it looked good. I liked that the peplum wasn’t so exaggerated, and I think it actually makes the silhouette pretty flattering. I think for a hot, muggy day it could be nice, but only if you keep everything else neutral.

    • I don’t know, it looks really summery to me, but that could be because it’s snowing where I am right now. I think I could actually see when it is 100 degrees and really hot out wearing it with nude or grey and having it work for an office.

    • I think I might jump on that bandwagon and see if I can have a tailor somehow remove the peplum. I think that might tone it down a little. Has anyone ever had any success doing that?

      • Agree, my first thought on seeing this dress was that the peplum has to go.
        I have never had peplums (pepla?) removed from a garment, so can’t answer your question.

    • I’m going to go against the grain and say it looks fine to me. I think the neckline is a tiny bit low (scarf?), but I’d still wear it. I’m small busted, though, and can get away with a lot more than larger ladies can, so you’d have to see how it looks on you. I think with the right jacket (cotton with elbow sleeves, and a length that somehow works with the peplum) or cardigan, plus jewelry (I’d go for a more substantial gold chain and bracelet to give it some gravitas) you’d be okay.

      • hellskitchen :

        I agree with TBK. On my screen the yellow looks muted and the fabric doesn’t come across as too shiny. For summer, I’d pair it with a gray or camel blazer rather than black, and add substantial accessories. A heavy gold chain link necklace would look great.

      • I’m going to agree here. I think the dress could be fine. I like the peplum- I think it’s cute and subtle. The color wouldn’t work on me, but it would look beautiful on someone else. With the right accessories, I don’t see a problem with this dress.

      • +1. Love Kay Unger dresses!

    • if not for the peplum, it might be ok to wear to work. but i live in a tropical climate.

  4. Recommendations for a red leather tote similar squarish bag? $200 or less. (Less preferable :).)

  5. Diana Barry :

    Why that model looks so sad? We should cheer him up. :)

  6. Anonymous :

    Has anyone ever gotten pregnant while they had an IUD? I have a Paragard, but my period is late and I’m freaking out that I may be that statistically less than 1% person. (It’s not late enough yet to take a pregnancy test, but arrgh). Someone please calm me down. Or alternatively give me crazy remedies to make my period start.

    • Okay. Calm. Down. Breeeaaathhhheeeeeeee. Inhale… Exhale…. (I am just like you, i have to mentally tell myself to breathe, see: yesterday’s thread)

      How late are you? It is MOST likely nothing. Have you called your dr’s office? They can also tell you what the next steps are and calm you down.

      Okay are you breathing now??? now distract yourself so you stop thinking. Focus on a work project/put on some music, etc? HUGS, it will all be okay!!

    • Isn’t there some commercial that says their pregnancy tests work days before you missed your period? If you’re that worried, you could probably take one.

    • Peeing on a stick (aka a home pregnancy test) is usually a surefire way to kick start a period. Alternatively, wear some white jeans out in public.

      In all seriousness — some of the more sensitive HPTs may be accurate enough to be reliable.

    • Part of having an IUD is that it messes with your cycle. Mine comes late or not at all. You’re probably fine!

      • + a million. Having an IUD has changed my period dramatically. And for 28 yrs of my life it was exactly the same. BTW just to put yourself at ease take a test- at least out here, if you have Kaiser they will do a preg blood test for free w/out you needing to have an order in. You can also get them at the dollar store. There is about a 0% chance of me being pregnant ever atm but I’m totally paranoid & I keep them around just for this situation.

    • Could be it related to stress or some big (non-baby) life change? That can send my cycle into a tailspin. I agree that you should take a test. If your period is late enough to make you worried, then it is certainly late enough to justify a test – and arguably trust the result.

      • +1 on this. A regular old deadline at work can make me late by a few days. Yup my stress levels are hair-trigger, apparently.

    • Baconpancakes :

      Ok, first thing, how long have you had your Paraguard? If it’s within the first year, I’m told your period can vary wildly. Mirena usually just makes your periods go away or reduce down to almost nothing, but Paraguard just throws everything off the rails.

      Otherwise, parsley, feverfew, ginger, and/or yarrow teas are emmenagogues.

      What usually works for me, though, is planning a super special romantic night with my SO. Halfway through the night, like magic, I’ll start cramping and… whoosh!

    • Were you on hormonal BC before you got your IUD? I had forgotten how long my ‘natural’ cycles were, for me they’re between 34-36 days as opposed to 28-32 days. Knowing that was *my* normal cycle length was also really helpful when I was trying to get pregnant (and helpful to remind myself of now when I start to stress about being ‘late’).

    • Anonymous :

      Yes, I have gotten pregnant with ParaGard. Now calm down, go buy that pregnancy test and go from there.

    • My friend’s neighbor did. Really. Not an urban legend. I never got the full details though, so I don’t know what kind of IUD it was.

  7. Anonymous :

    Wow thanks for this idea! My husband wears things to death and this is something he would REALLY appreciate! I’m kicking myself that Hanukkah is already over and so we’ve already exchanged all our gifts. Pinned this on a secret board so I can get it for him next time I need a gift!

  8. Miz Swizz :

    Can anyone recommend a mall store where I can buying matching Christmas sweaters for me and DH? I’m not seeking an ugly Christmas sweater per se, I just want something kitschy for a party we’re attending.

  9. Mr. Monday wants a fair isle sweater that only has the pattern around the neckline (as opposed to all over). So far I’ve only seen one at J. Crew– if anyone knows of others please post?

  10. People have chatted on here before about travelling with babies plus generally having your young kids in public spaces. I thought this article on APW was absolutely lovely and thought I would share it here: http://apracticalwedding.com/2013/12/international-travel-baby/

    (Preemptive caveat that this approach obviously doesn’t work for parents who don’t parent and look on indulgently at screaming toddlers and I know many have those horror stories.. but I like this approach in general and it fits w/ the way I see the world.)

    • Aww, I love this! My parents took me and my little sister all over the world when we were little, because my dad had work overseas, the first trip my sister was only 6 months old! And they say it was the best thing they ever did. It definitely required more planning than traveling without kids, but once they got a routine down, it wasn’t that hard. And they also say some countries were way nicer about having kids around than the US, although they did say France was a little bit of a pain. Also, they drugged us every time we got on a plane ;o) their trick was half a Dramamine crushed up in a spoonful of jam, so we were basically always sleeping through long-haul flights. And I still appreciate having such a wide view of the world from such an early age. So, I promise I will never complain if I’m on a plane next to you and your kids ;o)

      • R in Boston :

        My family traveled a lot while we were young and always did the dramamine trick for airplanes. (And interestingly, we found France very easy with small children.)

      • Baconpancakes :

        My mom also drugged me for our international flights (average of 2 round-trip each year from the US to Asia). When I suggested it to a friend who was worrying about a flight with her 2-year old from DC to LA, she told me that was child abuse. Whaa?

    • Baconpancakes :

      Also depends on the kid. One friend’s kid sat quietly and dozed or gurgled to herself in her carry seat during dinners at restaurants, choir practice, even a play. Another friend’s kid screamed bloody murder any time his parents weren’t paying attention to him for the first year, and once he learned to crawl he squirmed and ran around and generally got into trouble immediately. He also had colic.

      If a child is generally well-behaved, I agree that they should be welcomed in public areas, and if he or she shrieks every once in awhile, laughing or crying (toddlers shriek when they laugh! it’s so weird!), sure, whatever. But maybe fine dining and bars should be accepted as no-kid zones?

      • Orangerie :

        Yeah, public areas are one thing, but if there are spaces designated for kids, I think bars and other adult spaces should remain as adult spaces.

        • Not to be a grump, but I agree. I love babies/kids but if I am on a date or catching up with a girlfriend over dinner or at a bar it seems ludicrous that I should just smile and say oh how cute when your infant is crying 2 feet away and needs its diaper changed. See post this morning re: savoring some adult time and not making your child the center of the world. I know this is not what the blogger was envisioning, and in some settings it probably is appropriate to be more accepting of small children, but it seems like there should be a line somewhere.

          • Orangerie :

            Eh, I don’t think that’s being grumpy. You wouldn’t walk into a Gymboree class and expect to be served alcohol or find a quiet place to catch up with a friend… so I think the reverse should hold true and you shouldn’t have to apologize for feeling that way.

        • I agree, with the further caveat that it depends on timing. There are bars in my neighborhood (the insanely kid-friendly Park Slope) that have more kids than adults at 3 p.m. on a Friday. I think that’s fine. But at 8 p.m. on a Friday I would expect it to be largely kid-free — both for the adults’ sake and the kids (who should be in bed then). Same for restaurants. I’ve had dinner in a nice-ish restaurant with three kids and three adults — at 5:30 p.m. (And mascot, I think you’re right — the more you expose kids to adult dining establishments, the more they learn how to behave in them.)

          • I totally agree with this. As one of the commenters over on APW pointed out – a nice-ish local restaurant at 5:30 is very different from the same restaurant at 8:30. And a quiet movie in the afternoon is very different than an action movie at 10 PM (where I have seen people with young kids which blows my mind!). And obviously there are some adult spaces that are not kid-friendly.

          • Totally agree. Last time dh & I went to a movie (can’t remember what it was, but it was action for sure – I want to say Wolverine? I think we’re due for another movie date) there was a crying baby there, and several people yelled at them to take the baby out. Granted this was the early show, not the late show, but neither was it the matinee, where we would have been more understanding. Or a family/kids movie.

          • Orangerie :

            If a baby is actually crying in the middle of a movie screening, the parent(s) should step out of the theater. Doesn’t really matter what time the showing is. I’d be pissed in the same way I’d be pissed if someone’s cell phone kept ringing and they refused to silence it.

      • One the things that is nice about living in a tourist town is that restaurants are more accustomed to accommodating kids. It’s nice to know that my child is welcome in some of the more upscale restaurants. We are really diligent about making sure he behaves properly and don’t hesitate to swiftly remove him if needed. He’s actually better behaved most of the time in nicer places than he is at the places you generally consider kid-friendly, like the neighborhood Mexican place. I think kids need the opportunity to practice their good table manners and have no issues when parents bring kids into nice places to work on those skills.

        • I went to a very nice Michelin-starred restaurant in Vegas back in June, and at the next table there were two women (I think mother and daughter) and a 5-year-old boy. The little boy ate off his mother’s plate and sat quietly, colouring and playing with a toy truck while the women enjoyed their dinner. I thought it was fantastic and was very impressed.

        • anon-oh-no :

          totally agree. We take are kids all over the place — including nice restaurants. I one is not behaving, we remove him (sometimes her!) until he can behave, and sometimes we have to get up and leave or decide not to go at all. But I simply dont agree that restaurants are for “adults.” Sure if a bar is 21 and over (or 18 and over), kids shouldnt be there. But otherwise, if the restaurant serves people, it serves people. I have been in pleanty of restaurants with adults behaving badly . . .

      • some of my best childhood memories involve having dinner with my parents in nice restaurants…. I was that kid who got cross if I was offered a children’s menu if one was available. granted in retrospect they probably werent fine dining, but it did leave me with a lifelong love of steak….

      • saltylady :

        Yea I had the kind that wouldn’t sit in the carseat thing, squirmed constantly, and wanted attention all the time. They’re like a different breed than the babies I know who just sit there. We stayed home for a long time, and the one time we did travel to Hawaii, it was misery. Same sh*t, different location. But they are the most awesome travelers now so it’s good.

    • Sydney Bristow :

      I don’t have kids but this is really interesting. It’s worth checking out some of the discussion in the comments. I am one of the people sometimes annoyed by children, but always just on the inside. I never comment to the parent or passive aggressively to whoever is sitting next to me. The post is definitely food for thought though.

    • I like this in theory but think there are some places where it’s inappropriate to bring your children. Nice restaurants, bars, small boutiques (there is not enough room for a stroller) and stores on black friday (yes this year I got attacked at the mall by an aggressive set of parents with two strollers)

    • I’m with the writer, all the way up to the baby shriek of happiness. I realize that parents hear this so often they become immune to it (and, hey, the kid’s happy), but for others it’s really ear-piercing and painful. So a handful of loud and boisterous noises? Sure. But the baby who does this every ten seconds for an hour? Not enjoying it. On the whole, however, I feel like it’s true that our culture treats babies and children very differently from other cultures. An Indian-American friend of mine recently went to India with her husband, infant, and toddler. I asked how she managed the long flight, and she said “oh, it was no problem at all! Flights to India are full of children and all the old aunties basically spend the flight playing with the kids. My kids had three old ladies to look after them and we actually got some sleep!”

      When I worked in West Africa, I took the bus-like-things to work and was amazed that little children (as young as 4 or 5) would climb on by themselves to go to school. Once on, they’d often sit in the lap of some adult (stranger). (Was this safe? Um, no, but the buses were beyond unsafe anyway. I usually had to hang onto a handle to keep from falling out the door.) There simply was no concept of stranger danger. Another time, a friend and I were in a village and had to pee. She just went up to a child we saw and asked if we could use the toilet at her house. The child took my friend by the hand and led her to the family outhouse. The child was probably 7! Can you imagine this interaction in America — either the adult thinking to ask a child a question like this, or a child bringing an adult to her house? My friend couldn’t figure out why I was so shocked by the whole exchange.

      • Ahh, I lived in Laos for a while and was so surprised at the beginning by kids sitting on strangers’ laps on public transportation. But yes, if a mom got on board with multiple kids, I was often handed a random toddler or one would just climb into my lap. I occasionally got a little bit of suspicious side-eye from the kids because I obviously wasn’t a local, but hey, a lap is a lap apparently.

    • Flying Squirrel :

      I think the key here is actually parenting. Perhaps because US culture is more hostile to kids, so many parents fail to ever set up appropriate boundaries for how children should behave in mixed-age environments. I recently spent a weekend with my sisters kids and a couple weeks later with my SIL’s kids. Both sets of kids are almost exactly the same age and gender mix.

      My sister has been taking her kids to places with adults since always, and they are generally invited to sit at the adult table at family gatherings. When they shout, or put their feet up on things, or throw things, they are gently told that it isn’t polite behavior, and they stop. If they start demanding that the conversation center around them, they are told that there is a larger conversation going on. If they want to participate they are welcome, but it’s rude to cut someone off even if it’s an adult.

      My SIL generally doesn’t take the kids to mixed-age type environments, and family time is often all about them. So my nephew is allowed to completely dominate T-giving dinner by shouting about what he doesn’t want to eat, throwing things, and standing on the furniture. Activities that aren’t 100% about the kids can’t be planned b/c they will throw tantrums.

      I get that kids need kid time, but I also think that empathy is important. And some of the first people kids can learn to have empathy for are the adults around them. So you’re not a bad parent if you explain to your child that mommy and daddy (or mommy and your aunt/her sister) are in the middle of a conversation. And the child can participate, but she can’t demand that everyone stop and pay attention to her instead. In the long run, that’s a valuable life skill.

      • Flying Squirrel :

        I should add that I totally know the heavens are going to smite me down in a couple weeks when my baby arrives, and I discover that I simply don’t have the ability to teach my kid these lessons or control her behavior in any way ;)

        • Yeah, as it turns out, children are really small humans with their own feelings, ideas, moods, and free-will. So try as you might, there are times when you really won’t be able to control everything that they do as if they were an extra limb. It’ really hard sometimes to get all that energy flowing in the right direction. Now if only I could remind my mother of this when she expects a bunch of toddlers to behave like perfect angels…

      • I also don’t have kids but thoroughly agree with your last paragraph :) Good luck with your baby squirrel! I know parents who have managed to communicate those values to their kids so it is doable. :)

      • Co-sign all of this (and the heavens will smite, me, too, Flying Squirrel!). I knew a woman who thought it was ridiculous when someone expected her 13 year old daughter to sit and behave properly through a formal meal. (And, no, the girl had no disabilities or other issues that would make this a challenge for her. The mother thought no 13 year olds were old enough.) Thirteen? By that age you should definitely be practicing adult behavior, including polite dinner conversation and how to eat like a lady or gentleman and not gross out your dinner companions.

      • Sydney Bristow :

        I agree too. I think people on both sides have some middle ground to find. The people out without children who overreact to the minor annoyances should deal with being around children in public better and the parents out with their children who are misbehaving should remove the child from the situation. There is bad behavior on both sides.

        Someone in the APW comments suggested that similar things so common in the US, for example getting upset about a mother breast feeding her child in public or because a gay couple kisses or holds hands in public. I’d throw in something that came up on AAM today about disciplining employees for their behavior in public outside of work. In that example it was supposedly just “using foul language” but people in the comments had other examples. It seems like there has been both an increase of people being over sensitive and people acting horrible at the same time.

    • Baconpancakes :

      After reading the comments on this board, I’m less inclined to agree with the author. Anyone who disagrees with her gets shot down by the author herself, and she keeps insisting that if you can take an elderly relative somewhere, you should be able to take a baby, and that normal baby noises are perfectly acceptable in all public places.

    • That’s interesting – I’m not sure where in the US the author lives, but what she described has pretty much been my experience wherever I’ve taken my little guy (Tennessee and Washington DC, basically). Is she exaggerating the baby-unfriendliness of the US, or are my experiences just unusual?

  11. Does anyone know how this sweatshirt fits? My honey is tall, slim, and long-limbed; I’m wondering if it would work for him. Thanks!

    • Anonymous :

      I’ve read that these are slimmer than most other mens sweatshirts, not sure about the sleeve length.

    • hoola hoopa :

      My brother has that build and loooooves his American Giant sweatshirt. He’s 6’1″ and wears a M tshirt. I’m not sure whether he wears a M or L in the sweatshirt. Believe it or not he actually told me once, but I can’t remember. I feel like it’s a M.

    • A word of warning to the OP – given the lack of spelling mistakes and lack of annoying-ness in your post, I’m guessing you’re not the same Ellen that likes to troll this site. You may want to change your handle to avoid confusion. Or, maybe this is a sign that Ellen is actually a regular non-troll poster and forgot to change her handle when she wanted to ask a normal question?

      • And has finally CAUGHET a HUSBAND? Grandma Leyeh will be thrilled. YAY!!! BABIE’S!!!

        • More likely though, I’m guessing it’s an innocent poster.. you may want to pick a different name, OP :)

          • I assume it’s just a coincidence as well, but yes! The first thing I thought was, “which of all the men in Ellen’s life is she shopping for????” Since none of them sound like good prospects and she hasn’t had a steady boyfriend in years (fooey!)

          • Yes, different Ellen. Sorry for the confusion, and thanks everyone for the input. It sounds like it might work for him.

    • I got one for my 6’2″ husband in a large (his usual size), and it was definitely a slimmer fit, but sleeves were long enough. It fit but was a bit snug. We ended up exchanging for an XL and then it shrank a bit in the wash and ended up being perfect.

  12. kjoirishlastname :

    Bottom question…

    There are several, somewhat linked…

    Trousers & trouser socks. If the trousers are unlined, how do you get the trousers from getting all bunchy with the socks when you walk? It’s not static, but rather just the fabric acting like velcro against one another. Just avoid it? Is there something like a slip for legs? Especially silky trouser socks? How do you resolve it?

    Secondly, this kind of builds on that question, but what are the best long underwears that you have found? My office is perpetually cold. I have a vornado heater under my desk, but literally, my office temperature makes my hands and my nose cold. And the rest of my body, unless I’m actually wearing more than 2 full layers on both top and bottom. Just a cami & a sweater doesn’t cut it, neither do long socks/boots & pants. What is your favorite for both warmth, light-weight/comfort/non-bulk?

    Lastly, I read that there are some of you who like a full slip (even in colors!) for wrap dresses. That makes sense. In the interest of not buying a thousand different undergarment options, do you sometimes wear a full slip under skirt/top? What are your go-to half-slips? (That don’t break the bank).

    This girl works in local govt, and so not a lot of discretionary cash!

    • hoola hoopa :

      Trousers/socks. It’s probably an issue with poor fabric pairing. Silkier socks should help you out.

      Long underwear: Lightweight Low Rise Long John Pant from WinterSilk. I feel like there are probably better top options that the coordinating top, but I really like the pants.

      Slips: Try it and see what you think, but I personally find a full slip under a skirt/top to be awkward. I have both.

      • Flying Squirrel :

        Frankly, I like the vasa*r e t t e half slips from Target, though I haven’t seen ‘em in a while. I think I’ve seen them at Walmart as well.

    • Flying Squirrel :

      Frankly, I like the vasarette half slips from Target, though I haven’t seen ‘em in a while. I think I’ve seen them at Walmart as well.

    • lucy stone :

      Fellow local gov with an Irish last name. I love Lands’ End long underwear. I’ve had a pair of pants from there since law school that are just starting to show wear.

    • I have full slips and i often wear them in the winter, beneath dresses and skirt/tops. I feel like they are less work when i have lots of layers going on already. I buy mine at vintage stores, though, always find great all silk ones for pretty cheap.

  13. mintberrycrunch :

    Hive, I need advice about sheets. I know we’ve discussed this before, but my google fu is failing me…

    I need a new sheet set – king bed, extra deep. I’d prefer cotton… and I’d like something soft and comfy, but I don’t want to spend a fortune either! Any favorites?

    • kjoirishlastname :

      Always look at TJMaxx, Ross, Marshall’s. They typically have fairly high thread-count designer sheets at a discount. $50-70 is pretty typical for a sheet set from one of those places. For that matter, though, I’ve gotten some pretty nice flannel sheets from Target

    • Senior Attorney :

      I’ve had great luck with sheets at Costco.

      • These are great and are especially suited to extra-deep mattresses.

      • I also love my Costco sheets. I bought a pair of Kate spade sheets at Homegoods once, and they pilled up almost immediately. But I’ve had my Costco sheets for about a year now and they are in great shape.

    • Flying Squirrel :

      We found a nice set at Tuesday Morning.

    • I love jersey sheets. My last purchase for the kids’ beds was from Sierra Trading Post – Kimlor brand. STP also carries high-end brands like Sferra and Peacock Alley.

      On a related topic, has anyone ever found flannel sheets that do not pill?

  14. Left Out at Work :

    I joined my office three months ago. I work in government, and my office is smallish–there are five attorneys and a support staff of around 15 people. I am the only woman attorney and the youngest person in the entire office. Three of the male attorneys in my office have been working together for almost ten years. They get along very well, and seem to genuinely like one another. I’m struggling to figure out to how to stop sitting out when they get together to discuss cases, especially my cases. Today they were gathered in the kitchen talking about an issue in one of my cases. I overheard the discussion and I wandered in, on the pretext to get my water bottle out of the fridge. But then I just stood there awkwardly because no one made an attempt to include me in the conversation, or even left space for me to jump in. How can I integrate myself into theses conversations? Has any one else dealt with this?

    • I think you just have to jump in. “That’s a really interesting point. I was thinking …” Also, if they’re talking about your cases, that means you can ask them about theirs. You may not feel confident telling them what you think they should do, but you can ask a question about the case and see where that goes. Another good way to get involved is to follow up. If you see an article that relates to something they/you were talking about, send it along. If you see an interesting issue, bring it up. I can’t tell you how often I find myself breaking the ice with something along the lines of, “did you see that column on e-discovery (or whatever) in the law journal today?” Or next time you pass them in the hallway and you’re going to get coffee, just say “I’m going to Starbucks, want to come?”

      For better or worse, it doesn’t sound like these men who’ve worked together for a long time are going to reach out to you (and sometimes older men just don’t feel comfortable reaching out to younger women), but it doesn’t mean they’re unfriendly. Inject yourself in the conversation!

  15. …. I may have to get one of these for myself. I love a good hoodie! I’d get one right now as it is my birthday but alas, things have conspired against me this day so I am just gonna sit here with my chocolates and tv shows.

  16. omg, this is cracking me up. One of my fb friends clearly just got hacked, their status message: “MY CYPRUS ADVENTURE. I know you get these messages all the time that some one is stuck in a foreign country and requests money. And they are all a scam and everyone has received them. BUT THIS TIME, it was me, and I really do need money blahblahblah” (emphasis mine)

    please tell me I’m not the only person who just laughed out loud….

  17. I am a banana. :

    Suit color pairings question for a mid-sized firm interview in SF.

    Navy suit lovers, please tell me whether it is acceptable to:
    1. Wear a navy suit with intentional black (black shirt, black pumps, black bag); and
    2. Wear a navy suit with a light gray shirt, nude heels, and a tan bag (or alternatively if this is acceptable, but not for an interview).

    Overthinking, obviously.

    • Orangerie :

      I’m an unabashed navy suit lover, and while I think the black pumps and bag are okay (provided your suit is blue enough that it looks like an intentional difference), I wouldn’t do a black shirt.

      #2 sounds fine, but summery (nude heels and tan bag push it firmly into this territory for me). Why not wear the light gray shirt with the black accessories?

  18. Probably too late in the day for this, but… It’s freezing in my office. All of the time. Any recommendations for a very soft and warm wrap or small throw that I could put around my shoulders when it’s cold? Preferably in a dark neutral color (black, navy, or charcoal grey – a subtle pattern would be okay). I spent a lot of time in the office so I’m willing to treat myself, but ideally under $100.

  19. Need help with a gift suggestion for a member of my husband’s family. She is a professional in her mid-30s, has good (and expensive) but simple/classic taste in clothes and jewelry. She is an extremely picky eater and doesn’t cook. I don’t know of any hobbies. I don’t think she travels much for work and, from what I’ve heard, only takes short personal trips. Anyone have any foolproof, works-for-everyone gift suggestions? We’re looking to spend $25-40.

  20. The core hoodie from LuLuLemon is a great hoodie too. A little pricier at $118, but my husband has had it for a year and hasn’t ruined it yet. And he has tried.

    http://shop.lululemon.com/products/clothes-accessories/mens-jackets-and-hoodies-hoodies/Core-Hoodie?cc=12685&skuId=3523259&catId=mens-jackets-and-hoodies-hoodies

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