5 Tips For Surviving the Day After an All-Nighter

how to look great the day after an all nighter2016 Update: Check out our recently-updated story on how to look great the day after an all nighter at work

We’ve all been there — stuff needs to get done, and stuff needs to get done now. In the high-stress job, the all-nighter (sometimes several nights in a row!) is par for the course. One of my bosses once said she reveled in looking like crap the next day, wearing it as a badge of honor. I don’t. If you look sloppy and tired and incoherent, well, that’s how you tend to get treated. So, that said, here are my tips for how to avoid looking and acting like the walking dead, after the jump.

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Poll: How often do you dryclean suits?

how-often-to-dryclean-womens-suitsWomen’s suits: No one really knows how often to dry clean them. For men, the answer that is given time and time again is the same: Rarely. Once a season, maybe. The less the better. But then again, men’s suits fit differently than women’s, and the things men wear beneath a suit (the long-sleeved shirt, the undershirt, the boxers) are very different than things a woman wears beneath hers — our skin is in contact more with the suit. So let’s take a poll: how often do you dryclean? (Photo by uncleboatshoes, courtesy of Flickr.)

Except! Before we get to the poll, we’d like to pass along this advice from a recent Esquire article by Dr. Oz (he of Oprah fame):

De-plastic your dry cleaning. Right now. Go into your closet and remove the clothes from their plastic capes, then hang the clothes outside for an hour. There’s a toxin almost all dry cleaners use called perchloroethylene, or perc, and it’s not something you want in your lungs. So either find a dry cleaner who doesn’t use it — some now use liquid CO2 instead, which is good — or air out your duds every time. But not in your bedroom — then the perc inhabits your other clothes.

Ew. OK, poll time:

how-often-to-dryclean-womens-suits

Our $.02: Dry-cleaning is expensive, bad for the environment, and bad for the clothes. Also, we never seem to be available when the dry cleaners are open to go pick up the darn stuff. Thus: We dry-clean our suits as soon as they begin to smell. For other items in our closet: We have a “first year” rule for cashmere, and will follow the tag directions for the first year of purchase, but after that we’ll give it a whirl in cold water with Woolite. (And, then air dry, of course.) (And we have yet to be disappointed with Woolite.) For dresses, we dry clean only if visibly dirty — unless we’ve borrowed a formal gown from a friend, in which case we dry clean it before returning.

Like our polls?  Click the new link on the sidebar and go take all of our polls, including our very first poll (about whether bare legs are appropriate in the office).

The Secrets of Style [Esquire] (scroll down, it’s there)
Dry Cleaning Your Clothes [Ask Men]

Weekly Round-Up

nailtiques– Fashionista declares it so it must be so: Black nailpolish is dead. (If it were ever appropriate in an office anyway, which is debatable.) [Fashionista]

– Oh, good, we like to laugh: “Report: Women Increasingly Choosing Dead-End Careers Over Dead-End Relationships.” [The Onion]

– 5 mini-laptops worth lugging around. [Smart Money]

– In case you’re in need of some mini-speakers for your office computer: MUG recommends this pair by Klipsch.

– Wot? A useful Facebook application that lets you add your friend’s birthdays to your Google calendar? No way. [Lifehacker]

– NYT has an interesting take on the age-old conundrum: rent versus buy. We like the advice: If you can rent something for $2100 per month ($25,200 per year) or buy it for $400,000, the “ratio” is about 1:16 — you should never buy if the ratio is over 1:20. [NYT]

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