Wednesday’s TPS Report: Bondage Dress

Our daily TPS reports suggest one piece of work-appropriate attire in a range of prices.

Zac Zac Posen Bondage DressSometimes, my system fails me — I saw this dress months ago, when it was still at a much higher price, and wanted to consider it for a Splurge Monday.  But it apparently fell to the bottom of my list, and I only just now rediscovered it.  The pro:  it’s now $147, down 70% from $490.  (The other pros: love that color, I think the seaming is flattering, and, despite the name of the dress, I think it’s a totally work appropriate dress).  The con: It’s available in VERY limited sizes.  Sizes 10 and 12, it’s your lucky day.  Zac Zac Posen Bondage Dress

P.S. If prices and inventory hold for Friday I’ll feature one of the dresses in the AMAZING LORD & TAYLOR DRESS SALE right now — but there are a TON of dresses marked to $39.99 (to which I think you can take an additional 15% off with code STYLE).  I noticed this Z Spoke Zac Posen Bondage Dress (featured on Corporette back in 2012) for $39.99, down from $199 — that’s a great deal!  For some reason it doesn’t come up if you search by sale, so you may want to hunt by particular designers you love. Suggestions: Pink Tartan, Lafayette 148 New York, Kay Unger (who all have pieces marked down, albeit maybe not quite as low as $39.99).  Readers who shop at L&T more often, which designers do you stalk at the store?

P.P.S. Vente-Privee has an LK Bennett sale that just started — it looks like there will be a ton of work-appropriate blouses, dresses, blazers (and yes, shoes) marked down. Looks like most clothes are $65-$125, and most shoes (regularly $375) are around $175. (Click here if you need an invite.)

Seen a great piece you’d like to recommend? Please e-mail [email protected]
(L-all)

Comments

  1. Yay! I love the Lord and Taylor sale!!! Thank’s for reminding me of it, Kat!!!!

    I have to ASK my dad niceley to lift the FREEZE he put on my VISA card b/c otherwise I will NOT be abel to buy clotheing on sale, and HE will be mad if I have to spend more for the same dress.

    I like this dress, but do NOT like the name Bondage Dress. If I were to tell anyone the name, they would start thinkeing that I was in to that stuff. FOOEY on that, b/c it subjugeates us as Women who are profesionals. DOUBEL FOOEY on men that think they can control our mind’s and bodie’s by labelling a dress as a BONDAGE dress. If I designed a SUIT, what would a man think if I called it a BONDAGE suit? Would I design it without a zipper so that a man would be in BONDAGE and have to pull down HIS pant’s to pee? FOOEY! That would NOT make sense, so I recomend that they CHANGE the name of the dress to some thing else. This dress is good b/c it is NOT low cut, and men can NOT see anything.

    Rosa told me she was excited that I would be goeing out with Earnie. I hope he is half as good as she says, but her ex-freind must not be that crazy about him exept to the extent he pay’s for her support and her kids support. YAY for them b/c she does NOT work at all and lives in Chapaqua in the house she made Earnie leave once they got divorced. Earnie lives in a Condo in New Rochele, which is up in Weschester somewhere. I do NOT want to live in Weschester, unless it is near Rosa in Chapaqua. FOOEY on Weschester!

    Today I think I will walk over to the L&T to see what I want to buy on Sale. I hope the manageing partner will reimburse me b/c I plan on getting new dresse’s for court. I will show him the internet link’s to see which dresse’s he will aprove in ADVANCE so I can just BUY them as soon as Dad UNFREEZE’S my Credit Card. Yay!!!!!!!!

  2. Is “AMAZING LORD & TAYLOR DRESS SALE” an homage to ELLEN?!

  3. Quick job interview Q-

    I applied for a job and got an email last week from a HR person asking if we could set up a call for this past Friday. She said it was not an interview but they were pre-screening for interviews. I had the call, it went great, she said that they would be in touch regarding scheduling interviews by Wednesday (today). I haven’t heard from her. Should I call/email and say something? It was great speaking with you, and what is the status of the interviews… (see I really can’t word it properly). Would love some help! I haven’t applied for jobs since law school so I am rusty.

    • I would give her the whole of Wednesday before even thinking about touching base. “By Wednesday” includes Wednesday, IMO.

    • Absolutely not today. It would sound like you couldn’t follow instructions b/c “by Wednesday” includes Wednesday. I wouldn’t reach out until Friday at the earliest- better would be early next week. I’d suggest using email when you do reach out.

    • Anonymous :

      To answer your question, while she technically didn’t get back to you by Wednesday, I wouldn’t consider her “late” until Thursday and probably wouldn’t even consider reaching out at any point this week…

      Out of curiosity, who conducted the pre-screen interview? Just HR? Or did it include someone from the department in which you’d be working? What kinds of things did the pre-screen cover?

      • Thanks everyone! The pre-screen was just one HR person, and she basically asked about the extent of my experience in this particular area of law, whether I would be willing to relocate, and my salary expectations.

        She said they only intend on interviewing 2-3 people and I took the phone call to be weeding out those who are expecting too much money, those who made it sound like they have more experience in this area than they actually did (it is a very specific area where people could say “yeah I have experience in that” but did they work on it once, or 90% of the time for the past year?), and those who are unwilling to move (since it seems like the job will require relocation in probably 2-3 years).

    • Ciao, pues :

      As for how to word your email I would suggest something like this:

      Thank you for speaking with me last week regarding the Job Title. I greatly enjoyed our discussion and remain highly interested in the position. Please let me know if there is anything further I can provide to you as you consider my candidacy.

  4. This dress is beautiful! I wish it came in more colors and sizes :-(

  5. Woods-comma-Elle :

    Calling Toronto Corporettes!

    I will be in Toronto for a couple of nights with my mum and dad in April – any awesome parent-friendly restaurant recommendations? Generic, rather than exotic as my mum is not hugely adventurous especially when it comes to spices. Reasonably priced good, as it’s a long holiday and want to spread the love, but budget is not a deal breaker. Also, any parent-friendly sports bars for watching the ice hockey in? I’ve been to TO before but it was like six years ago and I was a student so we ate like hot dogs the whole time!

    We will be staying near Union Station and though we will have a car, preference would be not to have to drive anywhere for food.

  6. Woods-comma-Elle :

    Ugh why did I use the c-word.

    Calling Toronto [readers of thissite]!

    I will be in Toronto for a couple of nights with my mum and dad in April – any awesome parent-friendly restaurant recommendations? Generic, rather than exotic as my mum is not hugely adventurous especially when it comes to spices. Reasonably priced good, as it’s a long holiday and want to spread the love, but budget is not a deal breaker. Also, any parent-friendly sports bars for watching the ice hockey in? I’ve been to TO before but it was like six years ago and I was a student so we ate like hot dogs the whole time!

    We will be staying near Union Station and though we will have a car, preference would be not to have to drive anywhere for food.

    • RealSports Bar and Grill :

      Very near Union is Real Sports Bar and Grill – nothing fancy on the food front (it is exactly what it sounds like) but it is giant and is great for watching hockey, or any sport, really. I would consider it parent friendly (if your parents are OK with a sports bar). There are about a million screens and the atmosphere is usually pretty fun.

    • OttLobbyist :

      Although it’s been awhile since I lived in Toronto, there are several chain restaurants in that area – Casey’s, Jack Astor’s, probably a Milestones. Also, some of the places on King West are bistro-style, so they always have steak and fries on the menu, and a basic chicken, and maybe something more unique for you if that is what you want. I almost miss Toronto when I think of the variety of restaurants… :)

    • Real Sports is amazing for watching hockey but you will probably need to make a reservation because playoffs start mid-April and it will be packed for pretty much all playoff games. They take reservations 3 weeks in advance.

      The area around union station has a ton of sports bar/casual restaurants so if that’s what you’re looking for, you’ll be fine. There is a Caseys, Jack Astors, Loose Moose (sports bar – also not a bad spot to watch the game). If you also go further west on Front Street (the street union station is on, there are a bunch of more casual but less sport bar-type restaurants. There is also a decent (although not fantastic) steak restaurant around there called Canyon Creek.

      To be perfectly honest, the food in this area is fine but nothing fabulous. We do have really great restaurants but they’re not centred around union station and the sports arenas unfortunately! If you’re willing to travel a few more blocks out of this area, let me know because there are a bunch of great places!

      • Woods-comma-Elle :

        Thank you and just to clarify, certainly we are not tied to being just next door to the station, more just that I wouldn’t want to take like a half an hour cab ride or something. Happy to jump in a cab/on the subway etc. for good food!

        • Ok in that case, my advice is to ignore everything above except for Real Sports. The food is decent and it’s just a great/fun place and the TVs are massive.

          Can you give me a little more guidance on types of cuisine? I know you said generic but a few more details will help and I can come up with some better suggestions.

          • Woods-comma-Elle :

            Awesome, thank you! Basically the sports bar is just for the atmosphere as there will be an away game while we are there and my dad and I are really into ice hockey so we are not bothered about the food in that instance.

            As for cuisine, when I say generic I suppose I mean like what we here would call modern European (range of fish/meat dishes with not necessarily any particular geographical emphasis)? In general, I’m a huge fan of eating something very ‘local’ everywhere, so like mussels in Belgium etc. anything like that with local produce/dishes etc would be awesome (I looked at Canoe, for example, which looks good!)

            (If it’s easier, I can be reached on ellecommawoods at the mail beginning with g)

          • Ok I would check out both Marben and Richmond Station, both use fresh, locally-sourced ingredients (or at least Marben used to – they’re under new ownership now so I’m not sure anymore. They’re also a close cab ride or a longer walk from Union. Jump is also fantastic and walkable from Union Station, as is Oliver and Bonacini which is a high-end chain in Ontario but fantastic.

            Canoe is amazing but SO expensive.

            Real Sports is one of my favourite places plus sometimes the athletes show up after a game so it’s really fun.

          • (Former) Clueless Summer :

            Check out the Gabardine for more casual but pretty damn delicious food – walkable from Union (it’s on the way to the Eaton’s Centre). Estario Volos (sp?) is also in the financial district and is delicious Greek food.

          • Canoe is good but will be dead on a weekend (it’s a business place since it’s in a tower)- also I think it’s overpriced for what it is.

            I like all of the recommendations above (Real Sports is sort of ‘the’ place to watch games, but Jack Astors opened a new spot on Front Street (near Church Street) that has big TVs and a good vibe too).

            I will throw in a few others- Origin is good but has small portions. Modus is good and walkable from Union- modern European for sure, great service (at least when I was there). Bymark is also in a tower and has good food, but again, on a weekend it might be kind of dull.

  7. I’m thinking about giving up buying shoes for Lent. I thought about what I could give up a lot yesterday. Some things don’t make sense because I don’t do them enough (like drinking). But I need to stop getting obsessed about shoes. I got a pair of booties in the mail the other day and they don’t fit so I’m returning them. I’m thinking there is nothing I need and it would stop me from impulse shopping. I suppose I could say clothes, too, but the weather is getting warmer and I still need to assess what clothes fit and what I need. But it is food for thought…

    • I just read “Lost and Found” by Geneen Roth, which is about people’s relationship to money and how in many ways it tracks with our relationships to food. She sees the need for “more” as often coming from our disconnection from what we already have (in both areas). No clue if you’d appreciate it, but it gave me a lot to think about, and it seems like it might complement your Lent idea.

      • Sydney Bristow :

        I got this from the library a few days ago and am looking forward to reading it.

        • Nice! I’d love to hear your reactions–I have the impression that we’re nonfiction buds so I welcome suggestions from you too. Next up I have a bunch of alcoholism memoirs and the book “Slack” about problems with the concept of workplace efficiency.

          • Sydney Bristow :

            Definitely! I actually just finished a book about Anonymous/LulzSec/4Chan called We Are Anonymous that I thought was great. Totally fascinating yet horrifying at the same time. It was a good precursor to The Circle by Dave Eggers (fiction), which I’m about 1/4 through.

            Slack sounds interesting. I’ll have to look into that one too!

          • OMG The Circle was the most provocative book I have read in years. I wrote pages of notes in response to it! Please feel free to check back in when you’re done with that too.

          • And I just ordered We Are Anonymous–this is a topic I’d wanted more on anyway.

          • Sydney Bristow :

            There is another one coming out this year by a professor. I can’t remember what it’s called, but the author of We Are Anonymous mentions it in the acknowledgements at the end. I’m really looking forward to it because I want to dig more into the topic.

        • Thanks for the tip on We are Anonymous. I’ve been looking for more books on the subject. I finished The Circle recently and could NOT get it out of my mind. Perfect book for a plane, too, because it really sucks you in. I read it on a cross-country flight and was fascinated.

    • I’ve always like the idea of “giving up” time for Lent. As in volunteering with an organization, or picking up a good habit, instead of denying yourself something. I think it still connects with the message of Lent, as in you are sacrificing something – and the fact that you are doing something (instead of NOT doing something) brings that sacrifice to mind in a positive way.

      My two cents.

      • That’s an interesting idea! I never used to give up anything for Lent. I’m Protestant and, growing up in the North, we just didn’t do that. But being Protestant in a Catholic city is so different. So many of the Catholic traditions have bled over into the Protestant churches (like All Saints Day, which I’d never heard of). I do think it’s good to do something truly sacrificial for Lent – that’s why it requires some thought. Most food and drink things for me aren’t sacrificial because I’ve been trying to cut way back on sugar and I don’t eat a lot of salty food or fried food or things like that. I thought about Yogurtland ;) but that’s one of my few indulgences at this point and I limit it already.

      • This is something my Sunday school teacher as a kid was really passionate about, and it certainly influenced how I think about Lent. Instead of only giving up something (sweets, shopping, drinking, etc.), I like to also pick something to “do” whether that’s volunteering, donating money, cleaning out my closet to donate clothes to a women’s shelter, etc.

    • burberry scarf :

      As I cannot afford a real Burberry scarf–I am giving up non-essential spending. I shop at goodwill (wearing a Gap wool pinstripe blazer, Express jeans, and lace-bib white shirt from GW today…) almost exclusively, and while it is affordable, like you said, there’s nothing that I need right now.

      The 40-day reprieve from spending (though I do have bras in transit from Amazon, and I will continue to do the shuffle with gift card money until I find some I like) will make it sweeter when I do get to go shopping again, and like you said–I will be able to reassess my spring wardrobe and make better / wiser choices at that time.

      Solidarity, sister.

    • I’m “giving up” something and “taking on” something. I’m taking on devoting more of my time – either through reflection/meditation or through charity work. I’m “giving up” saying unkind things about people, as well as letting other people say unkind things about people around me. I know that at this point I can’t completely stop thinking unkind things, but if I actively work on not vocalizing them to anyone, not even my best friends, I can eliminate some of the negativity in my life and work on becoming a better person. :)

      • That is such a great idea! I like the idea of letting go of the negativity.

      • Wildkitten :

        +1 That’s a good idea.

      • What a great idea!

        I’m giving up being judgemental regarding other people’s choices. I generally try to publically project a ‘you do you’ attitude, but I worry that sometimes the thoughts in my head may start to come out either consciously or subconsciously.

        I’m also chosing to start a regular, recurring donation to the food pantry (cash, because in my area they can do a lot more with cash than with food donations). I figured, why not make it a whole year thing.

      • Anon in NYC :

        This was something I really worked on a few years ago, just in my every day life. I didn’t want to be that person who made conversation by complaining (about myself or others). It has made an amazing difference in my outlook and general disposition. Overall I feel more positive, happy, and content. I still have negative/unkind thoughts and occasionally voice them, but the percentage is much lower.

    • Catholic anon :

      Yes, the last few years I like to think about what extra reflectional/religious things I can add into my life. Some suggestions I’ve encountered over the years: go to more daily masses, attend stations of the cross or lamentations each week, say a rosary each day, pray the liturgy of the hours, read daily devotionals/Bible passages/religious books/ pope’s works, save money from buying simpler food/less shopping/whatever and donate all that saved money at the end of Lent, fast willingly every Friday. There are lots of things to do during Lent beyond just ‘give a special thing up.’

      I think we can also think about these things in terms of, what makes our lives more holy and more contemplative. Priest at service today said giving up chocolate type things are just fine if they help you to be more holy and think openly about receiving God into your heart during this time. But he encouraged us to think broadly about what that means to us. I would like to give up television one year and only allow us reading and quiet time in the evenings because I think that would help me personally bring in more peace and contemplativeness into my life that Lent is so great for.

    • lucy stone :

      I am giving up my snooze alarm, which I did once during law school and it worked wonders. I’m also “giving up” 40 bags of stuff. We have way too much at our house in terms of clothes, shoes, and general clutter and there are other people who could use things that we have laying around.

  8. The bottom half of this dress is making me think of the same thing that Georgia O’Keefe paintings do. Can’t unsee.

    • Yep. This is my big issue with this dress, too. Made me think of advice I once read in Cosmo: wear pink because it will make a man subconsciously think of your v*gina. Seriously!!!! (I think this is maybe when I completely stopped reading Cosmo). This dress seems like it might do the same for your whole office.

  9. burberry scarf :

    I happened upon what I think may be a Burberry scarf at Goodwill–but since buying it, I have convinced myself it wasn’t. Until one of my girlfriends made me think twice about it. It’s not pure cashmere, but the likelihood of it being cashmere/merino blend is reasonable. It is the iconic plaid but not in the deep tobacco-y color, more like the lighter taupe/almost blush pink-but-not-pink.

    How can I find out if it is authentic? It never had any label on it.

    • I understand your curiosity, but does it make a big difference? If you like it, wear it. If not, not.

    • burberry scarf :

      No difference at all, really. I’m just curious more than anything. But, with me being convinced that it isn’t Burberry, actually lessens its value to me, knowing that it is…

      It’s a really hard concept to communicate, but I’ll try. I’ve never been one to even consider high-end fashion because it is always out of my financial reach. It is just a given in my life, and I have come to terms with it. Spending $200 on a scarf is $200 that could have gone to an entire summer wardrobe for me. So when I thought that it wasn’t Burberry, it actually made me want to save up and buy a piece of Burberry (be it a scarf, or wallet, or other small trinket), and the cost-to-value ratio for me would be very high. Lots of cost, but in the end LOTS of value/earned-it feeling.

      If I happened upon one, it’s serendipitous for sure, but it doesn’t have the same blood-sweat-tears to get it, KWIM?

      I doubt I would sell it if it is genuine–I would keep wearing it, and just have a good story to tell.

    • Because that print can be bought for $5 on any major city sidewalk, I would assume fake if found at Goodwill unless shown clear evidence to the contrary.

    • If it doesn’t have a tag, it’s probably a fake.

      • a passion for fashion :

        That’s not necessarily true. Most of the tags (and certianly on the older ones) are meant to be cut off, like a tag on a coat. Many people these days don’t cut them off because they want people to *know* they are wearing a Burberry scarf. But if it is from someone who cut it off (likely, the same type of person who would donate something like that to goodwill), it could be authentic.

    • You can’t.

      • Anonymous :

        False. Of course you can. Take it to a Burberry store for authentication.

        • Sydney Bristow :

          Many stores will not do this. I think Coach and Louis Vuitton do not allow their salespeople to authenticate products because it can be extremely difficult to tell and they do not want to be potentially liable for authenticating an item that turns out to be fake.

    • I picked up a Kate Spade purse at a thrift store one time and a passing worker said to me “It’s a fake, just so you know.”

  10. Is there any hope of teaching a kiddo to speak Spanish if the parents don’t speak it and can’t afford classes? Like some combo of books or videos? I would love to do that for my nephews.

    • My colleague’s son goes to a French immersion school. Neither parent speaks French, although they’re trying to learn so they can speak to him in French. When he went for his kindergarten tests at another school, they asked him to count to 20 and he did it in French!

    • YouTube can be a great source. I live in a very unilingual English speaking area and we’re trying to teach our daughter, my husband’s mother tongue. So that we’re not the only exposure she has to the language we are letting our daughter watch Sesame Street in the language we’re encouraging. There’s also lots of videos with simple kid songs in other languages. Our daughter loves her extra amount of 2nd language screen time.

    • I think there are apps for this that are like games. I watched a kid play one in a doctor’s office once. It was like a monkey game where they had to pick the right color according to the Spanish word.

    • www DOT bbc DOT co DOT uk/languages/spanish/ — this is a great site and there’s a section for kids (scroll down on the left hand side)

    • Yes…check out the Muzzy DVDs…kid I babysit for love them, and they learned a ton of Spanish from them. I think they might be BBC or CBC? Anyone help me out here????

    • Kontraktor :

      While you may get a child being able to count to 10/say isolated things with that approach / be more familiar with language learning in general, they aren’t going to achieve any true level of fluency as they would in an immersion program, if they had a caregiver speaking to them full time or even if they did weekend classes.

      For the latter, could you check out any local ethnic community centers or churches? Often they may have language classes for reduced prices on the weekends. I know a lot of my friends growing up did Chinese language school on Sundays through their local primarily Chinese churches; maybe that sort of thing might offer a more affordable or discounted rate? Alternatively, if the child goes to daycare, could the parents maybe look for a daycare where they emphasize speaking spanish? You might be able to find this through a church community or in-home daycare where the owners ‘specialize’ by only speaking Spanish.

      • My nephews go to a daycare where only Spanish is spoken. It’s just the cutest thing when the oldest- who’s 3- comes back speaking Spanish phrases or when he speaks to the baby in Spanish.

    • People need to actually interact in another language to learn it to proficiency. You will never learn another language by just watching spanish/french tv. So the child needs to actually speak it and not just hear it. Immersion school is the best way, you could see if anywhere has saturday morning classes.

    • Only let them watch TV in Spanish.

  11. Dress w/sleeves PSA :

    This dress is now $88 with the sale code (the red is even cheaper). It’s great – doesn’t wrinkle, very comfortable and flattering. I have it in multiple colors.

    I wear my normal J.Crew size in this.

    https://www.jcrew.com/womens_category/suiting/dresses/PRD~08173/08173.jsp?Nbrd=J&Nloc=en&Nrpp=48&Npge=1&Ntrm=crepe%20dress&isFromSearch=true&isNewSearch=true

    • (Former) Clueless Summer :

      Was already mulling this over but you made me pull the trigger! (…4 other items hopped in the cart too)

    • Rural Juror :

      What would you suggest for someone between sizes? I am a pear shape and am between a 4 and 6. Sometimes I find the armpits on the 4 a bit tight (and the hips can be an issue, obv.)

      • Dress w/sleeves PSA :

        That you order both to try b/c shipping is free at $150+ :)

        • I have this dress in red and it’s really great. I’m usually a 6 in Jcrew clothes and am small busted but with wider hips. I ended up going with the 4 in this because in the 6 the darts didn’t line up right in the bust. The waist is higher up than a normal A- line dress so having a wider bottom didn’t affect it.

    • Just an FYI that the red is final sale. While occasionally you can still return final sale items, it’s not a given.

      I actually just returned this dress over the weekend. While I loved the length and sleeves, the torso was too long and the chest area was too large for me.

    • Are the sleeves cut at all generously, or are they as narrow as they look? I love sleeves for the coverage, but unfortunately, I have trouble fitting my upper arms.

  12. I'm Just Me :

    A quick review of 2 Target dresses for the frugal ‘rettes among us. I’ll link in the reply.

    1. Mossimo® Women’s Con Scuba Dress — this is a nice thick scuba fabric with decent drape. Despite the Body Con in the name, it is not what I would consider to be tight, instead it skims, and the skirt has a nice flare. The blue is a darker blue than it looks in the photo, almost a bright navy. Fits TTS.

    2. Merona® Women’s Ponte Print Dress — again, a nice thick fabric. This dress also comes in a solid black with white piping, but given Target’s website you need to search for it under Women’s Ponte Dress — black. The skirt is straight and a little snug, so it might not be good for a pear or someone with a tuchus like Ellen. The front slit on the top is work appropriate.

    I’m 5’5″ and the first dress comes to the lower part of my knee and the second dress comes to the upper part of my knee.

  13. The back of this dress is not really work appropriate IMO. With wildly fluctuating office temps throughout the day, I wouldn’t wear anything that *needs* a jacket over it to be appropriate.

  14. Email ettiquette :

    What are your ladies’ thoughts on emails of yours being forwarded on without your knowing? A friend and colleague a few weeks back asked for help on an issue. I told her that though I’d worked on it, someone else in my department would actually be a better person to ask, and because he’s someone with whom we’re both friends, I didn’t send an intro or anything. Nor did I copy him on the email telling her he was a better resource, since our email exchange involved non-work stuff talk.

    Today that other colleague of mine jokingly said, “thanks for putting that question on me!” and said she’d forwarded her request to him with my email saying he was the best person, and he went through the chain and saw where I said she should talk to him. It bugged me. Couldn’t she have just asked him without including my email? Plus she didn’t copy me. I find it kind of rude, I don’t know. It doesn’t help that we had non-work related conversations in it (nothing embarrassing) that I didn’t intend for others to read.
    I should say, she’s a great person whom I generally like a lot.

    • She shouldn’t have done that. If it bugs you, I’d just say something along the lines of, “Hey, please let me know if you are going to forward my emails in the future. Even though there was nothing especially personal in our exchange, I would prefer if Co-Worker didn’t read it or I at least knew about it before he mentioned it.”

    • Woods-comma-Elle :

      Yeah I don’t like this and I would also be annoyed. There is a fine line because some things are ok to forward, but I feel like that is things that are genuinely all business and informal/personal e-mail should not be forwarded without asking the other person. Particularly in this situation where there was not really anything to be gained from sending him your e-mail as she could have just said ‘oh, can you help me with this’, as you say.

      Some people have a terrible habit of forwarding stuff because they are trying to cover their backsides or relinquish responsibility – not saying this is the case, but the key is not to put anything on paper that wouldn’t stand up if forwarded (a lesson that I have some trouble following!).

      • Email ettiquette :

        Honestly, this is why I’m infuriated. It would have been incredibly easy for her to just say, “Hey, can you help me with this.” They’re friends, after all, and he helped prepare the doc that led to the question. Why involve me in it? It makes it seem like “I wouldn’t bother you, but X said I should.”
        It’s interesting – my boss actually brought up this phenomenon months ago, as an email of his that he intended for just the person to whom he was writing was forwarded on. It was in the same capacity -“I tried to ask X this but he said to ask you.” My boss found it distasteful, too, and suggested it’s something in the younger generation, which I found interesting but don’t necessarily agree with. For context, he and I are both in our late thirties, so I think he thinks this is something more common among the millenials.

        • Anonymama :

          I could see being annoyed about it, but “infuriated” seems like a bit of an overreaction. I think sometimes it may be meant more as, “X suggested that you would be a good person to ask about this,” though it can also come off as “X wouldn’t help me, she said you could?” She really shouldn’t have forwarded an email if you also discussed non-work-related stuff, but I also don’t think it’s really out of line, especially considering she is fairly good friends with both of you, and the two of you also seem to be fairly friendly. Honestly I hate being cc’d on extraneous emails so I’d personally be annoyed if someone cc’d me on something after I’d already told them I couldn’t help.

    • While I generally assume that anything I write could be forwarded, I still think it’s bad taste for the forwarding party to not edit. At the very least, it’s disrespectful to the recipient by including all sorts of extraneous info and essentially saying “here, read this chain, half of which doesn’t apply.”

    • Well, you did point her to him, after all. I think forwarding the chain is the normal thing to do with email, though not if it includes some embarrassing personal detail. She probably should have snipped that part out, but maybe she thought it wasn’t a big deal.

    • I think it would have been reasonable for her to have said “[Your name] suggested I directed these questions to you,” but it was inappropriate to forward the chain both because of personal details and respect for the person’s time–why does he need to read through an email chain just to see that you referred her to him?

    • Diana Barry :

      This is why if a friend asks a question, I usually write a new email to him/her and cc the other person. That way it is a totally new email, you are making the introduction yourself, and it is a “clean” business-y email.

      But yes, it is poor taste to forward and not edit.

    • I understand why your upset by it, but have noticed that it’s increasingly common among my co-workers and friends. I generally figure that anything I type can be forwarded and consider that when writing emails – which frustrates my friends to no end because my answer on so many topics is “let’s talk about it the next time we see each other” or “give me a call.” If I would be worried about someone else seeing what I wrote, then it’s something I will only say.

      Did the email that was forwarded explain the situation? It is possible that your co-worker thought it was easier to just forward the email instead of re-writing a full description of the situation and question?

      • Email ettiquette :

        Thanks so much, all, for your replies! Very helpful -I feel validated. You all hit the nail on the head, and Woods Elle especially by suggesting it’s kind of just relinquishing responsibility/covering one’s back. Which is disappointing, about my friend. I just generally hate the idea of emails that are crafted and intended for one person’s eyes being forwarded on to an unintended audience, all because the forwarder wants to show they have a reason for contacting the person without assuming the responsibility themselves.
        I love the suggestion, too, of just next time writing a clean email making the introduction. Or even better, just recognizing that emails are likely to be forwarded so I should write them accordingly. :)
        Thanks again, everyone.

      • Email ettiquette :

        @DCR – great question. But nah, it was a one sentence explanation – she could easily have re-written it.
        And I like your take – more calls and less emails from here on out.

        • PSA — This may never apply to you, but I have to just point out that the litigator in me looooves when I find an email in discovery that stops an email chain short and says “call me to discuss” or “let’s talk in person.” Sometimes it’s innocent, but it’s like catnip to me and I’ll be all over you in deposition on this. I’ve adopted the habit of simply picking up the phone instead of saying “I’m picking up the phone.” Just cleaner.

          • Email ettiquette :

            That was very cool of you to share, TBK! Excellent advice – thank you.

          • You go through just one set of discovery, where you’re looking at, say, 5-10 people’s emails, all of whom had no idea anyone would be combing through their stuff, and your own email habits change drastically. I never mix business and personal stuff in a single email and almost never use business email for anything personal anyway. I treat every email as if it’s going to be on the front page of the NYT/WaPo/WSJ. I never say anything bad about anyone else in business email. I keep all business out of my personal email. If someone else says something bad about someone in their email, I don’t reply but start a new chain instead if I need to respond to something else in the message. And if I need to say something that I don’t want on the record I PICK UP THE PHONE. If my clients did a quarter of this, my job would be easier (but then, if the other side did a quarter of this, my job would be much harder).

          • Email ettiquette :

            These are such critical tips that I would never have considered. You rock for sharing them.

          • anon new admit :

            Thank you for sharing these tips, TBK (including the ones below, which are at the reply to limit). They’re really useful.

    • WestCoast Lawyer :

      I guess I’m the lone voice of dissension, but I’ve always followed the rule that I don’t put anything in writing that I would mind seeing on the front page of the NYT. Granted, when I forward other people’s emails I sometimes edit out unrelated parts of the message (although this also feels somehow dishonest, like I’m trying to hide something), but I wouldn’t be upset if this type of email was forwarded, and if I had told someone to go ask another colleague would probably expect them to forward the message.

      • Agreed. It’s pretty standard practice in my organization to either forward the original email (although I often copy the person I’m referring them to on my referral email) or namecheck the person who suggested you contact them (i.e., Hi Ken, Emily suggested I contact you regarding x). It’s not about abdicating responsibility or passing the buck, it’s about setting context.

        I agree that in this case it sounds like forwarding it was a wrong call, based on the type of email and the fact that the people involved all know each other. But in general – not a big deal and nothing to get infuriated about. TBK’s advice on email is excellent.

        • Email ettiquette :

          Right, Marilla – in general it’s not a big deal and nothing to get infuriated about. In this context, though, I think it was uncool.

      • Email ettiquette :

        Thanks for your perspective! I don’t know – then at the very least she could have copied me on the message too, yes? I didn’t even know she passed it on until he told me. Which kind of shows that she knew it was a bit underhanded.

        • Isn’t it possible she thought there was no point copying you on extra emails, though? I wouldn’t assume underhandedness unless there’s something else that’s sort of pinging your office politics radar.

    • I would annoyed also. I, like others, generally assume anything I put in writing will and can be viewed by others. I hope it’s not, but I assume it will be. Frustrating, but reality.

      A CEO I worked for did this with EVERYONE’s emails. Emails that she had NO business forwarding. This was one of many horrible business practices and, IMO, ethical issues, with that business. And part of why I expect the business to stop functioning very shortly. Unreal.

  15. Question for the lawyers out there. I am a junior/mid level associate. I just closed a deal a few weeks ago, and I’d like to solicit feedback from the partner. I’ve never really gotten in the habit of soliciting formal feedback and would like to start. What would be the best way to go about doing this? Emailing the partner and saying something like, I really enjoyed working with you on X deal and would like to continue working with you. Would appreciate your thoughts on my performance on X deal and what I can do to continue to improve? Or something along those lines? For what it’s worth, this partner is not in the same location as me or I might just stop by casually. Thanks in advance ladies.

    • Woods-comma-Elle :

      I think this sounds like a sensible approach – it may be worth asking if s/he might prefer to have a few minutes to have a phone call to discuss (as that would involve less work on the partner’s part). Keep it casual – if the partner wants to give feedback, s/he will be happy to engage, if not, you have lost nothing by asking.

    • I wouldn’t ask. If you screwed up, they’ll tell you. Asking makes you look very millennial.

      • Anon, could you please expand on your thought?

        • Sure – I honed in on the planning to ask regularly for feedback piece. I don’t think it’s terrible to have a conversation about how the deal went but there’s a line between that and reassurance seeking. There’s tons out on how millennialist need constant feedback and I think regularly seeking it can rub those of a different generation wrong. (Obviously not everyone so again, know your people/office).

      • I get what you’re saying but, ugh, this is one of the things I hate most about how the practice of law (especially at the big law level) has changed. There’s so much pressure to bill ALL THE TIME that senior lawyers no longer are willing to take the time to mentor and groom younger lawyers. It’s such a shame. I see how it seems really millennial (“I need constant feedback all the time to feel secure!”) but honestly it might be healthy if associates started asking for just 15 minutes here and there to get feedback on how to improve. It really should be seen as an investment, not a time-suck.

        • I like this approach. There’s no harm in calling the partner and saying you liked working on the deal, would like to work on his/her next deal and is there anything he/she thinks you should be doing. I’d actually avoid the specific word “feedback” as that can come off as needing validation (I don’t think it should but some folks of a certain generation do). Also, feedback sounds formal and partners have a hard enough time giving appropriate comments during the formal review process. Keep it informal and about wanting to continue working with that partner.

        • I agree with this. My husband is in a different professional field and he’s the one that taught me to schedule feedback meetings with superiors every quarter to six months to check and make sure that I’m progressing/not screwing up/on track for promotions, etc. I don’t think it’s “millenial” (I’m not one, besides), I think it’s taking responsibility for my career.

          For what it’s worth, these types of meetings have been well-received by the partners I work with. It might be different at different law firms with different cultures, however.

      • Unless the partner is very reserved, gruff, and formalistic, I don’t think this makes you look millennial. Partners know they’re supposed to give associates feedback. Those who care remotely about associate development feel guilty they don’t. Asking if partner is available for a quick chat about your performance gives him/her an easy way to do this and absolves them of guilt for a while.

      • “If you screwed up, they’ll tell you.”

        I don’t think this is necessarily true. Often in the crush of closing, as a person overseeing (whether it’s a junior associate overseeing paralegal work, senior assoc overseeing junior, you get the idea) it’s just easier and faster to fix the mistakes than try to have a teaching moment. And then when everyone disperses post-closing and drinks to forget the madness, the mistakes are forgotten about. I think it’s helpful for anyone in a junior role to check in and ask if there was anything they can do in the future to make senior’s life easier. This doesn’t have to carry the tone of “I’m sure I screwed up, what was it this time”, but can be more “What additional things can I do?”

        • Woods-comma-Elle :

          Yup, exactly this. All that will (likely) happen is the person will not use you anymore and you will never know why or fix something that could potentially be a relatively minor issue to fix.

        • Anon who made the comment here, that was my experience. If you pay attention as a deal or case progresses, you’ll learn what works and what doesn’t and most lawyers aren’t shy about saying what they think. Also trying to model yourself off of one deal won’t necessarily work for the next one (different people/players). Just pay attention and learn as you go.

      • I sort of agree with this. I think an email expressing that you enjoyed working with the partner and would like to do so again is great. I would leave it at that. If you want feedback, get it as you go. For example, if a partner marks up your doc or suggests changes to something you did and you don’t understand why, ask about it at that point. That way you don’t seem like you are asking for a grade at the end of the semester, so to speak.

    • burberry scarf :

      Rather than saying “how do YOU feel that I did?” as the way that you phrase your questions, perhaps a better way to ask is to say something like, “I want to ensure that I am covering all my bases to perform excellent work for the firm, and with our history of working on X deal, perhaps you can help me identify things that I can do to improve.”

      That way, you’re not asking partner to make some kind of judgement call ON you. You’re asking for help for something that YOU do. I can see that if it is with a partner you’ve not worked with before, the only response is, “you did fine” which doesn’t really tell you anything at all. Partner may not feel comfortable offering judgement-y type feedback if they’re not your supervisor or mentor, but would feel comfortable offering some concrete, business-things/processes that you DO, rather than what you ARE. Does that make sense? Basically de-personalize it for them.

      Kind of like the whole mantra of arguing fair–don’t ever say “You do this, that, and the other.” The way to phrase it is, “I feel XYZ when you do this, that, and the other” Put the onus on yourself, rather than the other person.

    • We actually just had an associate pre-review meeting and the number one thing they told us was to never ask for feedback in email. This probably depends on your firm but all the partners said they would be super annoyed if they got an email like this and would think it was awkward. They stated they had no problem giving feedback but would much prefer the associate stop by their office and ask for it in the natural flow of the conversation.

      • What if you do not work in the same office as the partner? OP said she works in different location.

        • Pick up the phone. Call them. Have a conversation. This is the number one complaint partners have about associates of a certain generation – refusal to use the phone.

        • As someone who works almost entirely cross-office, I can’t stress enough how important it is not to rely on email for everything. I look for excuses to be in the other offices and when I am, I make sure these conversations happen. Can you complete the work entirely using email, yes. Can you succeed at a firm and make all of the interpersonal connections necessary to have mentors and sponsors and all of that important intangible stuff, no way. This is why it is so important to participate in the soft stuff – happy hours and lunches, etc.

          • How does going to a happy hour or a lunch help in meeting partners and attorneys at other office locations? Not trying to be snarky, just wondering what you mean by that.

          • I find excuses to go to the other offices and participate in those types of things with the lawyers in the other offices. My point is if you are in office X and work with attorneys in office Y, you’ve got to find ways to be in office Y and spend time with those people so that you develop a relationship. You can easily work from two offices, but if you want to advance (ie, make partner in a firm), I think it’s important to get some face time. And when you are working remotely, I also agree with the point above that it’s important to pick up the phone and not always rely on email.

    • Anonymama :

      I could see being annoyed about it, but “infuriated” seems like a bit of an overreaction. I think sometimes it may be meant more as, “X suggested that you would be a good person to ask about this,” though it can also come off as “X wouldn’t help me, she said you could?” She really shouldn’t have forwarded an email if you also discussed non-work-related stuff, but I also don’t think it’s really out of line, especially considering she is fairly good friends with both of you, and the two of you also seem to be fairly friendly. Honestly I hate being cc’d on extraneous emails so I’d personally be annoyed if someone cc’d me on something after I’d already told them I couldn’t help.

    • I think I would ask for a few minutes to chat and not word it as a direct ask for feedback. Most partners I work with are kind of awkward about giving feedback, especially negative, so if you approach it as a more of a checking in conversation, talking about work you’re interested in and asking for career at the firm advice in general, that would give them the opportunity to give you some feedback without making them feel so awkward about it. Then, at the appropriate moment in the conversation, perhaps when you’re talking about what sort of deals you should be working on and what you need to be learning at your level, you can make the more specific ask – was there anything on [prior deal] that you feel like I need to improve upon and can you suggest another deal/resource/thing to do/person to work with to help improve that area?

  16. San Diego Recommendations :

    Hi all. I just found out that I will be in San Diego next month for a few days. I will be working part of the time, but will also have some free time to go exploring. Looking for any recommendations of things to see, restaurants, etc. TIA!

    • Monello, near the airport is delicious. Also loved fig tree cafe and urban solace. I’d say go to the beaches even if it’s a quick trip; you’re usually no more than a 15 min drive away from one (though I’d say skip silver strand). Definitely go to Coronado!!

    • 100 Wines in Hillcrest is delicious. If you like pork, there is a great little place on University called the Carnitas Snack Shack. Lots of great cafés and wine bars in Little Italy (India St). The best Mexican food is not in Old Town – too touristy. Head up to Solana Beach and go to Fidel’s. The Brigantine in Del Mar has delicious fish tacos. They also have a Coronado location.

      If you’re into zoos, the SD Zoo is amazing. As is its Wild Animal Park which is in the northern part of the county.

      If you like architecture, the new central library is beautiful. I just did a tour last weekend. The touring piece of the Vietnam War memorial is here and will be down by the USS Midway. Coronado is fun – it’s like a small town with a navy base attached.

    • Sunset magazine just did a feature on the Gaslight District. Def check their online archives for a great San Diego trip. (They are best California magazine–sorry I recommend it on here so much!)

    • AnonLawMom :

      Point Loma Seafoods is very close to downtown and it is a great spot for a casual lunch by the water. The fish sandwich is ridiculous.

  17. Ladies, I’m leaving next week for a Caribbean vacation (first vacation in 9 years!!). I need some new recommendations for good beach reads. I don’t usually like sci-fi/fantasy, but otherwise am pretty open to ideas and ready to load up my kindle!

    • All the Jack Reacher books by Lee Child, if you haven’t already read them!

    • I loved reading 50 Shades while on vaca (if it’s your cup of tea). Definitely got the vacation going in the right direction…

      • Haha, funny story – I was reading 50 Shades at the pool in my parent’s development a few years ago, and a little girl (probably about 7 years old) came up to me and asked “Why are so many girls reading that book?” I can’t remember what I told her, but couldn’t help not laughing!

    • My recommendations will be romance novels, since that’s my current (going on about 15 years) kick.

      Historical romance – anything by Courtney Milan or Sherry Thomas. Both have series books and Sherry Thomas has some standalones. Will warn you, they tend to make me ugly cry (because of the well written characters and emotion).

      Contemporary romance – Louisa Edwards or VIctoria Dahl – both have series (usually trilogies) that are pretty good.

      Paranormal (which ranges into the sci-fi/fantasy) – Nalini Singh – has two series, the Angel series and the Psy-Changling series. Seriously awesome world building, but does play into the vampire/werewolf/psychic realm. But it a way that isn’t awful, if that makes sense at all.

    • The Amelia Peabody books are great for beach reading. The first one is called Crocodile on the Sandbank.

    • Thanks for the great suggestions! I will look into all of these!

  18. Formalwear question: This may sound silly, but what is the point of wearing drop-dead heels with a floor-length dress (for a formal wedding or similar)? Can’t I just wear ballet flats? I know that when I walk my shoes might show, but how much?

    • I admit I don’t know and that I wore comfy flats under my long wedding dress and no one was the wiser (and I was not in agony!)

    • Heels change how you carry yourself and tend to be slimming. I’d wear then for photos/ceremony but have a pair of flats for dancing.

    • Woods-comma-Elle :

      I’m short, so I would likely have to wear heels to (i) avoid having to shorten the dress and (ii) avoid looking dumpy. I think ultimately you will have to pick one or the other as it will determine the length of the dress – if you start off with sky-high heels with a dress that brushes the ground, you will need clips or something to avoid tripping all over the hem in flats.

    • I think I walk much more elegantly in heels than in flats. For me, this is true of any height heel so maybe consider wearing a shorter heel for more comfort and stability?

    • You could also think about very dressy wedges. They give you the height but don’t hurt your feet as badly. A friend wore a gorgeous pair at her wedding a few years ago for just this reason. They’re more delicate than typical summer wedges of course.

    • Just FYI, I am not the one getting married, but I still need to wear a floor-length dress. At my own wedding many, many years ago I wore mid-heel white satin pumps, but I’m kind of older now.

      • My mom wore low, chunky heels at my wedding and two of my sisters wore flats, all with floor-length dresses. I wore heels but switched to comfier, slightly lower heels for dancing (and yes, I had tripping/length issues even with that slight difference!). I would trade comfort/being able to walk without tripping/being able to dance comfortably over the slight additional boost to elegance/look in photos that heels would give you. Especially if it’s one of your children or a close relative/friend’s family wedding where you can expect to be not only walking down the aisle but right in the thick of the crazy dancing. (Which is the best part!)

        • You totally get where I’m at! Plus the bride is wearing flats and we’re about the same height without shoes…. so suddenly I will tower over her if I’m wearing 3″ heels. I just think if I’m wearing something similar to my every day flats I won’t feel festive enough.

        • Just letting you know that I am ordering dressy flats from Zappos right this minute.

          • I think that’s the best choice – especially something with some nice detailing on the toe so the part that peeks out under your dress looks formal and lovely. Congratulations on the wedding!

  19. LentenAnon :

    Hey everyone! Happy Wednesday! Does anyone have suggestions for Lent-friendly (FISH!) dishes? As someone originally from the midwest, we just didn’t cook much seafood. Basically all meat and potatoes. But now I’m really looking to vary my Lenten routine from the typical pasta and cheese sandwiches. Suggestions anyone?

    • This is one of my favorite fish recipes: http://www.thekitchn.com/recipe-ginger-cilantro-sesame-baked-tilapia-fish-24737
      Easy and flavorful.

    • Miss Behaved :

      I saw this recipe the other day and am dying to try it:
      http://www.howsweeteats.com/2014/03/crisp-skillet-sea-bass-with-pistachio-butter/

    • Are you near a Wegmans? They have salmon and tilapia that already has seasoning on it, and there’s directions on the box, and you just pop it in the oven. Same with WholeFoods. Fish goes well with mac and cheese. What about shrimp, crab, lobster, etc? You could also pick up some Philips Crabcakes in the frozen food aisle. You also don’t HAVE to eat fish on friday, you can make fridays a day to go vegetarian. Look up vegetarian recipes with beans, quinoa, etc….

    • Salmon: Get a couple of salmon fillets. Mix about 3 tbsp soy sauce, 1 tbsp mirin (available in the Asian section of most groceries), 1 tbsp vegetable oil, and 1 tbsp grated fresh ginger (all this is just estimated — adjust amounts as needed). Put the fillets skin side down in a dish with a rim and pour the marinade over it. Let sit 20-30 min. Broil the fish skin side down until done (which is a matter of taste — some people like it much rarer than others — but it will only be a few minutes so check frequently.)

      Tilapia: You can get these fresh or frozen and both work equally well. Defrost the frozen ones in cold water or in your fridge. Salt and pepper both sides of the fish. Put some flour in a dish with a rim and dredge the fish in it. In a large skillet, melt some butter over medium heat. Put the fish in the pan and cook on both sides until done (just a few minutes per side). Try very hard to only flip the fish once because you want it to develop a light brown crust as the flour cooks in the butter. Take the fish out and put it aside. While the fish is cooking: Take about 1/2 cup of hot broth (I use chicken but I think you could use vegetable if you needed to for lent) and add the juice of one lemon. Melt a pat of butter in the broth and mix it up. Lightly crush some capers (maybe a tbsp) and add them to the broth. When the fish is out of the pan, turn up the heat and add the broth mixture. Use a plastic turner to scrape all the fish bits on the bottom of the pan into the broth. Cook until the broth has reduced about half. Pour the broth over the fish.

    • Catholic anon :

      Fish is great. We probably eat too much during Lent. Thin pieces of salmon can be pan fried; start skin side down, cook for 5-6 minutes, then flip and cook for another 3 or so minutes. Serious Eats has a good overview on how to pan fry salmon. Thicker pieces can be seasoned however you like (we either do a sugary spice rub or just drizzle olive oil, herbs and lemon slices) and put in the oven at about 425 until done (at least 20 minutes). Lightly flour/season cod, sole, tilapia or other thin white fish and pan fry in a bit of olive oil and butter until done (not long, maybe 3-4 min/side if that). Cod, white fish or halibut can be baked in the oven with a topping of a little olive oil, sliced leeks and tomatos (regular or sun dried). You can also add olives if you want.

      Shrimp can be prepped in a myriad of ways. I like sauteeing in a pan with shallots and garlic and making a light sauce of lemon, vermouth, butter and hot sauce. You can also grill very easily and serve with grilledveggies of your choice. We like shrimp simmered in jarred curry sauce in a pinch, and we add peppers, onions and sometimes califlower. Also makes a great addition to alfredo pasta or lightly dressed olive oil/cheese/herb pasta with roast veggies.

      We also like crabcakes, or crab (nice canned crab is fine) on a salad of bibb lettuce, avacado, tomatos and hearts of palm. You can do the same salad with shrimp, or a southwesty type salad with lettuce, black beans, corn, scallions and mango with a lime chili dressing. Crab chowder is not too hard, nor are steaming mussels or clams (just use a little bit of broth, wine, aromatics and you’re set). You can also make tuna melts in a pinch, and I like tuna salad with white beans, tomatoes, celery and olive oil, lemon, a ton of parsley and chili flakes (to make it a bit italian) or just traditional with celery, onions, sometimes tomato and a little bit of lemon and mayo. You can also do smoked salmon and bagel night with all the fixings (hard boiled egg, capers, onions, cream cheese, lemon etc).

    • Gail the Goldfish :

      This is my favorite salmon recipe. It’s from a cookbook called How to Boil Water:

      Ingredients:
      1 lemon
      several sprigs fresh dill, plus more for garnish (I use dried dill; 1 tsp)
      1 tablespoon kosher salt
      1 heaping teaspoon sugar
      pinch cayenne pepper
      4 6-ounce center cut salmon fillets with skin
      vegetable oil (I use olive oil)

      Steps:
      1. Preheat oven to 300F. Line rimmed baking sheet with foil. Zest half the lemon into a small bowl. Finely chop the dill, about 1 tablespoon in all, and add to the bowl. Stir in the salt, sugar, and cayenne pepper.
      2. Lightly brush the salmon with vegetable oil. Evenly sprinkle the spiced salt over the top (but not the sides) of the fillets and place on the baking sheet, skin side up. Roast until the bottom is glazed, the sides are opaque, and the salmon is just ooked through, about 18 minutes. Transfer the salmon to serving plates with metal spatula or pancake turner. Add a sprig of dill to each and serve.

      I tend to cut back on the salt and add more cayenne pepper, but it’s very easy to play with the proportions until you find what you like.

    • This Asian Salmon Bowl with Lime Drizzle is one of my go-to fish recipes: http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/Asian-Salmon-Bowl-with-Lime-Drizzle-51101210

      It’s really easy, delicious, and fairly healthy.

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